Carmona (anc. Carmo; Moorish, Karmunah), a city of Spain, in the province and 20 m. N. E. of Seville, on the Carhones river; pop. in 1867, 20,074. It is a well built and handsome town, on an isolated hill commanding a magnificent view of the Andalusian valleys, and is surrounded by old and massive Moorish walls. Hardly any conspicuous remains exist of the many palaces and fountains of the Moorish era, excepting the superb ruins of the alcazar, which towers over the gate leading to Cordova. This gate, built on Roman foundations, is celebrated for its beauty. There is a tine old Gothic church, with Pacheco's picture of the "Descent from the Cross," besides six other places of worship, nine convents, two hospitals, and a university. Woollen cloths, hats, leather, and other articles are manufactured; but the principal trade is in wine and olives, there being over 100 oil mills. The annual fair (April 25) is much resorted to. - Caesar regarded Carmona as the most strongly fortified city of Further Spain, and Roman coins and other antiquities have been found here.

The place was rescued from the Moors by Ferdinand III., king of Castile and Leon, in 1247; and the castle of Carmona was subsequently used for a long time as a royal residence and refuge in times of danger.

Carmona.

Carmona.