Cedar Bird (bombycilla cedrorum, Vieill.; ampelis cedrorum, Baird), a bird of the wax-wing family, smaller, more southern, and less migratory than the A. garrulus, Linn. (See Waxwixg.) The general color is reddish olive, passing into purplish cinnamon anteriorly, ashy behind, and yellow below; chin black; under tail coverts white, but no white on the wings; in other respects like the waxwing. It occurs throughout North America, from Canada to Central America; it is usually seen in flocks, flying high and rapidly. The food consists of berries and small fruits of all kinds, which it eats to repletion and sometimes to its destruction; it takes its name from its fondness for the berries of the red cedar; it also eats insects. It is a handsome and sprightly bird, but has no song. It becomes very fat in summer and autumn, and is then highly esteemed as food in the southern states. It breeds in June, making a nest of grass in orchard and cedar trees; the eggs are three or four, purplish white with black spots.

There is a species in Japan, which has no red appendages on the wings.

Cedar Bird (Bombycilla cedrorum).

Cedar Bird (Bombycilla cedrorum).