Cocctlts, the fruit of a climbing plant, called by Linmeus menispermum cocculus, but now referred to a new genus, anamirta, imported from the East Indies. It is about the size of a pea, and somewhat resembles the bay-berry, having a dry, wrinkled exterior coat, within which is a shell enclosing a bitter, oily kernel. The bitter principle, called pierotoxino, is extracted by triturating the seeds with pure magnesia, and treating them with hot alcohol. To obtain it pure, it is again dissolved in alcohol, and treated with animal charcoal. After proper evaporation, it is deposited in crystalline form. In India, in Europe, and in the United States the cocculus Indicus, ground into a coarse powder, is used to intoxicate fish that they may be more easily caught. It is sometimes added to malt liquors, to increase their stupefying qualities. It is never given internally, but an ointment made from it is used in the East Indies as an outward application in obstinate cutaneous eruptions. A strong tincture of the fruit, rubbed upon the scalp of a child, has been known to produce fatal results.

Cocculus Indicus.

Cocculus Indicus.