Corn Snake, the common name of the coluber guttatus, Linn, (genus scotophis, Bd. and Gd.). The head is narrow and elongated, and the snout obtuse; the neck is contracted, the body very long, and the tail small and tapering. The color above is reddish brown, with oblong spots of brick-dust color bordered with very dark brown; the sides are lighter with small spots; below, the color is silver-white, with black squares of various sizes irregularly disposed; below the vent is a longitudinal line on each side, formed by a black spot on each scale. In a specimen 4 ft. long, the head was 1 1/6 inch, body 39 inches, and tail nearly 8, the greatest circumference being 4 inches; it attains a length of 6 ft. It conceals itself by day, and is generally seen early in the morning and about dusk; it enters houses, and is believed to devour chickens, as well as the small animals usually eaten by snakes. Its northern limit appears to be North Carolina. The abdominal plates are 126, the subcaudal scales 64.

Corn Snake (Coluber guttatus).

Corn Snake (Coluber guttatus).