Ischia (anc. AEnaria and Inarime), an island of Italy, in the Mediterranean, at the N. entrance of the bay of Naples; area, 26 sq. m.; pop. about 25,000. Its coasts are steep and rocky. Near its centre is the volcano of Epomeo, 2,500 ft. above the sea; its last eruption was in 1301. There are also 12 smaller volcanoes. The intervening valleys are of extraordinary fertility, producing corn, wine, and fruits in abundance. Its warm baths, the most celebrated of which are those of Casamicciola and Lacco, are much frequented, and, with its salubrious climate and luxuriant vegetation, make it a favorite resort in every season of the year. The chief town, Ischia, has about 6,300 inhabitants, and is the seat of a Catholic bishop. Its castle, a picturesque structure, stands on a high isolated rock of volcanic tufa and ashes, which rises out of the sea opposite the island of Vivara, and is connected with the mainland by a mole. It was built by Alfonso I. of Arragon in the 12th century.

Castle of Ischia.

Castle of Ischia.