Jedburgh, the chief town of Roxburghshire, Scotland, on the left bank of the river Jed, 42 m. S. E. of Edinburgh; pop. in 1871, 3,321. It is a well built and picturesque town, with manufactures of woollens, iron and brass wares, and machinery; but its history and antiquities give it its chief celebrity. The principal architectural remains are the ruins of the ancient and once magnificent abbey, built during the 12th century, and the castle, a favorite residence of the early Scottish kings, now used as a prison. - Jedburgh was the scene of many desperate conflicts during the border wars, when it was strongly fortified, and was regarded, with the dense forest near by, as one of the chief Scottish strongholds. The great abbey was burned by the earl of Surrey in 1523, and again partially destroyed by the earl of Hertford in 1545. The town was also the scene of incidents in the life of Mary Stuart. It is the birthplace of Sir David Brewster and Mrs. Mary Somerville.

Jedburgh Abbey.

Jedburgh Abbey.