Music (An Easy Method Of Teaching : The Rudiments Of). The Staff - Let the pupil be provided with a pencil and a moderate-sized slate on which has been previously drawn, with the point of a pen-knife, the Jive lines of the staff thus: -

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The pupil should then be desired to count these lines, commencing from the lowest, which is called the first-line, to the highest, which is called the fifth line ; and after that, the spaces between them. He must then be informed that the Jive lines and four spaces he had first counted form a staff, and that every line or space is called a degree, bo that the staff contains nine degrees, namely, five lines and four spaces. On these lines, and in these spaces, the heads of notes are placed, which are formed either in the shape of an open oval, or a circular blot. The teacher should illustrate this upon the slate, thus : -

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This must be repeated until thoroughly impressed upon the memory of the pupil, and until he is able to make the notes upon the lines and within the spaces himself.

The Treble, ok G Clef - Names Of the Notes. - For the second lesson the slate should be prepared thus : -

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And the pupil must be told that each of the notes just made are named from the First seven letters of the alphabet, - namely, A, B, C, D, E, F, G; but that, in order to tell the names of these notes, a clef must be placed at the commencement of the staff. But as it is our object not to burden the mind of the pupil with more than is at present absolutely necessary, it will be sufficient here to observe, that there are two clefs, namely, the Treble or G clef, and the Bass or F clef. The Treble or G clef turns upon the second line of the staff, and all the notes on that line are called G. The notes before made upon the staff must now be removed, and the teacher will write the Treble clef thus: -

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The names of the notes upon the five lines of the staff in the Treble or G clef must now be learnt, the teacher first adding the other four to the one already written on the second or clef line. The pupil must repeat after the teacher - E on the first line within the staff in the Treble clef; G on the second line within the staff in the Treble clef; B on the third line within the staff in the Treble clef; D on the fourth, etc. ; and F on the fifth, etc. Afterwards, at the discretion of the teacher, the notes in the spaces may be introduced, their names being also repeated in the same manner, namely, F in the first space within the staff in the Treble clef; A in the second space within the staff in the Treble clef; C in the third, etc.; E in the fourth, etc. The names of the notes in the spaces will be very easily learnt, as the letters combined will be found to spell the little word "Face." The slate should then be left thus: -

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And the pupil will now, no doubt, feel sufficient interest to conquer any little difficulty that may remain before the next lesson.

The Bass or F Clef - Names of the Notes. - The pupil should be carefully examined in the first and second lessons before the third is commenced. After which, any notes or letters that may be left upon the slate must he removed, and the Bass clef written at the commencement of the staff, thus: -

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The pupil must now be shown that the Bass or F clef is placed upon the fourth line of the staff, so that the two little dots are in the third and fourth spaces, and all the notes on that line are called F. The names of the notes upon the five lines, and within the four spaces of the staff in the Bass or F clef must now be taught in a manner exactly similar to that given for those of the Treble in the preceding lesson ; the teacher being particularly careful that the pupil repeats, after each note, the name of the clef. The Bass notes are generally found to be more difficult to learn than those of the Treble; the principal reason of which is that they are too often attempted before the Treble have been horoughly mastered ; and years afterwards, when playing, the pupil will frequently mistake an A for an F, or an F for a D. It cannot, therefore, be too fully impressed upon the mind of the teacher, that, even should it take six months to teach a child his notes upon the slate, they are at last really thoroughly learned; that knowledge will, at a future time, more than compensate both pupil and teacher for the time and patience expended in acquiring it. The slate must now be left thus: and the names of the notes well studied by the pupil before the next lesson.

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The Ledger-Lines in the Treble Clef. - Another staff may now be drawn with the penknife upon the slate below that one previously used for both clefs, and the Treble clef written at the commencement of the upper staff, and the Bass clef at the commencement of the lower The pupil is now required to write any of the notes already learnt in either clef, without hesitation, when directed by the teacher; and if this can be done with ease, the pupil may now be taught the Ledger-lines.

When more than nine notes are required, short lines are added above or below the