Swiss

The principal cheeses made in Switzerland are the Gruyère, the Neufchâtel, and the Schabzieger or green cheese. The latter is flavored with melitot.

Westphalian

Made in small balls or rolls of about 1 pound each. It derives

its peculiar flavor from the curd being allowed to become partially putrid before being pressed. In small balls or rolls of about 1 pound each.

Wiltshire

Resembles Cheshire or Gloucester. The outside is painted with reddle or red ocher or whey.

York

From cream. It will not keep.

We give below the composition of some of the principal varieties of cheese:

Double

Ched Glouces  Skim dar ter

Water.......... 36.64 35.61     43.64

Casein......... 23.38 21.76     45.64

Fatty matter......... 35.44 38.16       5.76

Mineral matter......... 4.54 4.47       4.96

100.00 100.00 100.00

Stilton Cotherstone

Water.............. 32.18 38.28

Butter.............. 37.36 30.89

Casein............. 24.31 23.93

Milk, sugar, and extractive matters... .          2.22         3.70 Mineral matter...... 3.93 3.20

100.00 100.00

Gruyère Ordinary

(Swiss)     Dutch

Water.............. 40.00       36.10

Casein............. 31.50       29.40

Fatty matter........ 24.00       27.50

Salts............... 3.00           .90

Non-nitrogenous organic matter and

loss.............. -1.50         6.10

100.00 100.00

When a whole cheese is cut, and the consumption small, it is generally found to become unpleasantly dry, and to lose flavor before it is consumed. This is best prevented by cutting a sufficient quantity for a few days' consumption from the cheese, and keeping the remainder in a cool place, rather damp than dry, spreading a thin film of butter over the fresh surface, and covering it with a cloth or pan to keep off the dirt. This removes the objection existing in small families against purchasing a whole cheese at a time. The common practice of buying small quantities of cheese should be avoided, as not only a higher price is paid for any given quality, but there is little likelihood of obtaining exactly the same flavor twice running. Should cheese become too dry to be

agreeable, it may be used for stewing, or for making grated cheese, or Welsh rarebits.

Goats' Milk Cheese

Goats' milk cheese is made as follows: Warm 20 quarts of milk and coagulate it with rennet, either the powder or extract. Separate the curds from the whey in a colander. After a few days the dry curd may be shaped into larger or smaller cheeses, the former only salted, the latter containing salt and caraway seed. The cheeses must be turned every day, and sprinkled with salt, and any mold removed. After a few days they may be put away on shelves to ripen, and left for several weeks. Pure goat's milk cheese should be firm and solid all the way through. Twenty quarts of milk will make about 4 pounds of cheese,

CHEESE COLORANT:

See Food.