The match play allowance in foursomes is three-eighths of difference between the aggregate handicap allowance on either side, a half-stroke, or over, counting as one, smaller fractions not being considered.

In match play strokes received are usually taken as shown in table on page 184.

Most clubs, however, may find it advisable to arrange a schedule of their own, according to the special nature and difficulty of the various holes. Such list should be posted in the club-house.

Another form of handicapping which is productive of very interesting matches is to allow your opponent so many "holes up" at the start. The usual mathematical proportion is two-thirds of the medal handicap. For instance, if the handicap allowance is nine strokes, six holes are conceded by a scratch player. This principle must, however, be modified somewhat as the higher handicaps are reached. Such system is not applicable to a club where members receive such handicaps as twenty to thirty strokes, as on the latter basis the scratch player would start twenty holes down in eighteen, which, of course, is ridiculous.

Strokes

Holes

I at

10

2 at

6

12

3 at

4

10

16

4 at

4

8

I2

16

5 at

1

5

9

13

17

6 at

2

5

8

11

14

17

7 at

1

4

7

10

13

16

18

8 at

2

4

6

8

10

I2

14

16

9 at

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

10 at

2

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

II at

2

3

5

7

9

11

13

15

17

18

12 at

3

4

6

7

9

10

12

13

15

16

18

13 at

3

5

6

8

9

10

11

12

14

15

17

18

14 at

2

4

5

6

7

8

10

II

12

13

14

16

17

15 at

2

i 3

5

6

7

8

9

II

12

13

14

15

17

18

16 at

2

3

4

5

7

8

9

10

11

13

14

15

16

17

18

17 at

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

11

12

13

14

15

16 |

17

18

18 at

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

Another method, less commonly observed, is the giving of so many bisques, each representing a stroke to be taken at the pleasure of the player receiving them, after the hole has been played. The use of a bisque at a halved hole converts a half into a win in favor of the receiver, or into a half if only one more stroke has been taken.

Still another plan is to concede all holes as lost when halved, only those won outright counting in favor of the giver of such odds.

Generally speaking, the three last mentioned methods of adjustment are better adapted for private matches than for regular competitions, as it is much easier for two players to arrange their own terms between themselves so as to place them on a very close level, than it would be for the handicap committee to arrive at anything like satisfactory results with a large field. Everything considered, the system first referred to is capable of broader application, and fairer, generally, when the competition embraces a number of players. The mutability of the game of the average player makes it impossible to reduce any system of handicapping to an exact science - and it is perhaps just as well that it is so.