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Practical Golf | by Walter J. Travis



The articles in the following pages first appeared in serial numbers in Golf, and met with such gratifying encouragement that I have been led to present them in a comprehensive form. Their aim is to diffuse some practical knowledge of the "why and wherefore" of Golf, in order to the better assist in working a general improvement in play. With this hope this volume is dedicated to all lovers of the game.

TitlePractical Golf
AuthorWalter J. Travis
PublisherHarper & Brothers Publishers
Year1909
Copyright1909, Harper & Brothers Publishers
AmazonPractical Golf
Practical Golf

Illustrated From Photographs

Harper & Brothers Publishers

New & Revised Edition

Walter J. Travi

Walter J. Travis

-Preface To Second Edition
With the ink scarce yet dry it becomes necessary to issue a second edition, and I frankly own that I gratefully appreciate the ready recognition which the first met with. The original work remains int...
-I. Stance And Grip
The main object in the game of golf is to get the ball into the hole in the fewest possible number of strokes. I do not, therefore, purpose entering into any account of the history of the game, but wi...
-I. Stance And Grip. Continued
Reference to the first illustration shows that the right foot is a few inches back of the left. An inch or so either way matters little, but the more the right is advanced, the greater is the check to...
-II. The Swing
The wrist movement may be said to be mainly contributed by the left hand in its initial stages, the right wrist following in unison. At the top of the swing the knuckles of the left hand will be lying...
-II. The Swing. Continued
Fig. 10 Don't Press It is not given to every one to drive a very long ball. The unusually long players possess certain physical advantages which are denied to ordinary mankind in a degree. Some natur...
-III. The Long Game
In the upward swing it will be noticed that the body has been turned very freely, with the natural transferrence of weight almost entirely to the right foot, and that the left foot has been pulled up ...
-The Second Shot
On all first-class links a large number of the holes should be so laid out in respect to distance as to call for at least two full shots to reach the green. Where the lie admits and distance is requir...
-IV. Approaching
The quarter game, with putting a very close second, may be regarded as the most difficult part of the art of golf. In driving and playing through the green distance is the prime object to be achieve...
-IV. Approaching. Continued
Fig. 21a Grip For Approaching Address For Mashie Shot 60-80 Yards F ig. 20 Top Of Swing Finish Of Swing Approaching An exceedingly dead ball may also be played by standing well back, laying ...
-V. Putting
Assuming that the approach stroke has been properly executed, the ball should now be on the green, not so far from the hole as to render it at all uncertain about going down in two more- and very freq...
-V. Putting. Part 2
In respect to accuracy, it is imperative that you should act upon some well-defined principles. Proceed first by taking a glance back of the ball towards the hole, and trace the line over which it mus...
-V. Putting. Part 3
In putting, it is of prime importance that the body should be kept immovable, the hands, wrists, arms, and, to a certain extent, the shoulders only entering into the stroke. If the body be allowed to ...
-VII. Playing Out Of Hazards
On all first - class courses the bunkers or hazards are so arranged as to impose a penalty on a poorly played stroke. Outside of long grass these are ordinarily of artificial production and take the f...
-VIII. General Remarks
Practising. - With the majority of players very little, if any, time is given to earnest, painstaking practice; they want to play the round of the course and nothing but the round, pleading that they ...
-VIII. General Remarks. Continued
After the drive take your cleek and play the balls back, taking them just as they lie. Make a point of never improving the lie; rather go to the other extreme and place them in an indifferent one. Do ...
-IX. Clubs
To play the game properly the following clubs are necessary: driver, brassey, cleek, mid-iron, mashie, and putter. Although not absolutely essential a niblick may also be added. Many good golfers rare...
-IX. Clubs. Continued
Heads may be divided into two classes, those with a scare to which the shaft is glued and then bound with wnipping, and those into the neck of which a hole is bored to receive the shaft. The latter ar...
-X. Club Shafts
Having dealt with the head sufficiently in detail for all practical purposes let us now turn our attention to the shaft, which is, perhaps, the most important part of the whole club. A poor head on a ...
-Length Of Shaft The Brassey And Other Clubs
We now come to the brassey. This is substantially the same as the driver, excepting that it is a trifle heavier and more laid back, and has a brass plate affixed to the sole. Usually, also, the shaft...
-XI. Balls
The history of the rubber-core type of ball is very interesting. In 1898 Mr. Coburn Haskell, of Cleveland, Ohio, conceived the idea of winding a thin rubber thread, under tension, on a small centre of...
-XI. Balls. Continued
The one great weakness of the rubber-core ball has always been its tendency to crack, but improved methods of manufacture have reduced this defect very sensibly. Indeed, the marvel is that the balls s...
-XII. Caddies
A Good caddie is of material aid to the player. We have not been playing sufficiently long in this country to have developed the real article indigenous to the famous Scottish links, where the caddie ...
-XIII. The Construction And Upkeep Of Courses
There are comparatively few golf-links in this country, in the true sense of the term, while there are hundreds of courses. Most links are situated close to the sea, and the nearer they are to the lev...
-XIII. The Construction And Upkeep Of Courses. Continued
Third hole (four hundred and ninety yards). Some two hundred and fifty yards from the tee a road has to be carried on the second shot, otherwise there is no trouble. A drive, brassey and iron will lan...
-XIV. Putting Greens
The climate in this country can hardly be said to lend itself to the growth or development of natural greens of the first rank. The extreme heat and cold are not favorable allies. Therefore, all reall...
-XIV. Putting Greens. Continued
The application of sand will not only refine the quality of the grass itself, but will make it more impervious to wear. Not only that, but it will tend to minimize the worm nuisance. Concerning worms,...
-XV. Handicapping
The essence of handicapping is to put all the players on a common level - to give the poorest player an equal chance to win with the rest of the field. In order to adjust the handicap fairly it is nec...
-XV. Handicapping. Continued
The match play allowance in foursomes is three-eighths of difference between the aggregate handicap allowance on either side, a half-stroke, or over, counting as one, smaller fractions not being consi...
-XVI. Additioinal Hazards
It is not impossible to conceive of a course being laid out wholly and entirely free from bunkers or hazards of any sort or description, and yet furnishing good golf, provided always that the distance...
-XVII. Aluminum Clubs
Aluminum clubs seem to be growing in favor. Their increasing popularity is not merely a fad; it rests upon something more substantial than passing fancy or caprice - a recognition of the fact that the...
-Rules Of Golf
Definitions Side 1. A side consists either of one player or of two players. If one player play against another, the match is called a single. If two play against two, each side playing one ball, ...
-General And Through The Green
Rule 1 Mode Of Play 1. The Game of Golf is played by two sides, each playing its own ball. The game consists in each side playing a ball from a teeing-ground into a hole by successive strokes. The h...
-General And Through The Green. Continued
Rule 12 - Removal Of Loose Impediments I. Any loose impediment lying within a club length of the ball and not being in or touching a hazard, may be removed without penalty; if the ball move after any...
-Hazards And Casual Water
Rule 25 - Conditions Of Play In Hazards When a ball lies in or touches a hazard, nothing shall he done which can in any way improve its lie; the club shall not touch the ground, nor shall anything be...
-Putting-Green
Rule 28 - Removal Of Loose Impediments I. Any loose impediment may be lifted from the putting-green, irrespective of the position of the player's ball. If the player's ball, when on the putting-green...
-Special Rules For Match Play Competitions
Rule 1 On the putting-green, if the competitor whose ball is the nearer to the hole play first, his ball shall be at once replaced. The penalty for a breach of this Rule shall be the disqualificatio...
-Rules For Three - Ball, Best Ball, And Four-Ball Matches - Definitions
1. When three players play against each other, each playing his own ball, the match is called a three-ball match. 2. When one player plays his ball against the best ball of two or more players, the m...
-Special Rules For Stroke Competitions - Rules For The Conduct Of Stroke Competitions
Committee Defined Wherever the word Committee is used in these Rules, it refers to the Committee in charge of the Competition. Rule 1 - The Winner 1. In Stroke Competitions the competitor who holes...
-Rules For Play In Stroke Competitions
Rule 6 - Advice A competitor shall not ask for nor willingly receive advice from any one except his caddie. The penalty for a breach of this Rule shall be disqualification. Rule 7 - Playing Outside ...
-Recommendations For Local Rules
Special Hazards or Conditions When necessary, Local Rules should be made for such obstructions as trees, hedges, fixed seats, fences, gates, railways, and walls, for such difficulties as rabbit scrap...
-Etiquette Of Golf
1. No one should stand close to or directly behind the ball, move, or talk, when a player is making a stroke. On the putting-green no one should stand beyond the hole in the line of a player's stroke...
-Glossary
Technical Terms Used In Connection With The Game Of Golf - Addressing the Ball - The act of the player placing himself in position to strike the ball. Approaching Playing a ball on to the putting-gr...







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