For the purpose of feeding cattle, straw may be looked upon as a staple article of diet. It is also eaten in considerable quantities by horses which are turned into the straw.yard, and also by others in the stables, where they occupy some of their idle time in eating the straw which is used for litter. Indeed, it is often found necessary to apply the muzzle in order to prevent the indulgence of this somewhat dangerous habit. The principal and most profitable use of straw is when it is converted into chaff along with hay; there is no doubt that it very much assists in the preparation of food by compelling the animal to masticate it thoroughly. The following table shows the composition of different kinds of straw., of which wheat and oat straw are considered the best as food for horses: . ■

Wheat.

Oat.

Pea.

Bean.

17.28

Water ......

13.55

13.63

14.28

Proteids

3.03

4.55

7.56

12.01

Fat .........

1.10

1.64

2.17

1.31

Carbohydrates

40.90

36.95

29.39

31.80

Cellulose

37.48

37.97

42.47

30.67

Salts.........

3.94

5.26

4.13

6.39

It may be remarked here that barley straw is generally considered to be very indigestible, and quite unfit for food for horses.