An elaborate luncheon was served for an hour, until the multitude had been fed. The long procession then started, marching in couples, and the inspection of the great plant began. Every detail had been arranged. The path led from one building to the other, upstairs and downstairs, even through semi-darkened rooms - the line of march was said to have been two and a quarter miles long - and thirty of the forty-six buildings at the park were visited. At each turn, arrows pointed the way, and at least a hundred employes of the factory stood along the lines at intervals of a few feet to keep watch of the crowds and see that everything ran smoothly and to explain the points of interest to each group as it wound slowly in and out of the buildings. It was almost like a labyrinth; after the journey was started, there seemed no way to turn back. The lines wound in and out of the buildings, everyone eager to see things, and soon the astonishment at the magnitude of the plant was echoed on all sides. After walking for an hour - it seemed a day - one enthusiastic photographer from Iowa was heard to remark to his wife: "Are we still in New York State:'"

From Negative Made At Convention School By F. M. Somers.

From Negative Made At Convention School By F. M. Somers.

From Negative Made At Convention School By A. F. Bradley.

From Negative Made At Convention School By A. F. Bradley.

A Liberal Education

The inspection plans were so carefully arranged that any intelligent man - and most of them were photographers deeply interested in photographic matters - could not fail to gain more of an idea of the process of making photographic paper, moving picture films and the dozens of other products manufactured at the plant than he ever before had in all his life. It was a liberal education for the photographic fraternity. .Many of them said the visit to the Eastman factory was well worth coming to Rochester to see, even if there had been no convention here.

This extract from the souvenir book which was distributed to all the visitors conveys some idea of the impression that was gained by the visitors:

Thinking In Big Figures

"We are accustomed in this country to stupendous figures, and when they are applied to the output of a steel mill or the tonnage of a railroad, we think not so much of it, because the products themselves are large. But a moving picture negative is such a tiny thing, a post card is so small, an 8 x 10 plate is so insignificant as compared with a steel rail, and a camera is so unpretentious alongside of a locomotive or an automobile, that we do not look for mechanically big things in a photographic factory. In photography we think in grains and ounces and square inches - yet so great is the consumption of the various products that to complete the Eastman works we must think in acres and tons. In Kodak Park, 23 acres of floor space is given up to the manufacture of sensitized photographic goods; the new plate building now under construction will bring the total up to more than 28 acres, while our other Rochester factories with combined floor space devoted exclusively to the photographic business, brings the total up to 37 acres in Rochester alone - and there is still more under construction.

Some Eastman Statistics

"There are nearly 4,000 Rochester employes, and the capacity of our boilers is 6,700 horse power. The refrigerating machines at Kodak Park have a cooling power equal to the melting of 1,920 tons of ice daily. The works there are operated by 743 motors, varying in power from 1/12 to 75 horse power, and these, with 7000 incandescent lights, are furnished current by five engine-driven electric generators, with a capacity 1,800 kilowatts or 3,000 horse power. In the Kodak Park grounds, consisting of 43 acres, are two and a third miles of water mains, one and a third miles of brick pavement and three-quarters of a mile of railroad trackage."