Artura paper is exceptional as to quality and the properties of the Artura emulsion which give it this exceptional quality make it necessary to handle the paper, in developing, in a manner slightly different from other papers to secure the full benefit of its tone quality.

The most popular Artura tone is a warm olive black - not a green black - and every photographer who properly handles the paper knows that this tone may be secured without loss of detail or delicacy of gradation and without blocking in the shadows.

To produce the olive-black tone and avoid the greenish-black tone, which is not so desirable, it is necessary to have a knowledge of the action of Bromide of Potassium in the Artura developer.

If an Iris print is developed in the regular Artura developer minus the regular amount of Bromide of Potassium, the result will be a flat print of a bluish color. The development will be rapid and the highlights and white margins will have a veiled or fogged appearance.

Bromide is added to the developer as a restrainer to keep the whites clear while the developer acts upon the exposed silver. Only a sufficient quantity of Bromide to secure this action is included in the formula for the stock solution. The formula for developing calls for additional Bromide sufficient to give the proper tone under normal working conditions.

But local conditions sometimes make a greater quantity of Bromide necessary, and just here is where the manipulation of Artura differs from other papers. If the water contains an excessive amount of alkali or other chemical impurities which upset the balance of the developer and give a black tone where the olive is desired, add more Bromide. If the first addition gives a green-black tone, add still more Bromide, until with normal exposure the olive-black is secured.

Exposure also has to do with the color of the print, but normal exposures should always be made to secure the best results. The correct exposure for the average negative may be determined by a series of varying exposures, after which there will be but little trouble in judging normal exposure, because of the great latitude of the Artura emulsion.

With correct exposure the important point is to use enough Bromide to pass the black and greenish-black stages and secure the fine olive tone that has made Artura so popular with the portrait photographer. And no more desirable - no more pleasingly brilliant tone quality has ever been secured in a developing-out paper.

Tone Control StudioLightMagazine1916 41

ARTURA PRINT FROM DEMONSTRATOR'S NEGATIVE

Your friends can buy anything you can give them - except your photograph,make an appointment to-day.

THE PYRO STUDIO

Tone Control StudioLightMagazine1916 43

No. 222. Price, 50 cents.

Tone Control StudioLightMagazine1916 44

EASTMAN PORTRAIT FILM NEGATIVE, ARTURA PRINT

From Eastman Professional School Demonstration

STUDIO LIGHT INCORPORATING THE ARISTO EAGLE ESTABLISHED 1901 THE ARTURA BULLETIN ESTABLISHED I906 Vol. 8 MARCH 1916 No. 1