"Now let us make another type

A War Measure StudioLightMagazine1918 240

EASTMAN PORTRAIT FILM NEGATIVE, ARTURA PRINT

By Jerome Chircosta Cleveland, O.

"Your exposure depends upon your stop used, the speed of your lens and the depth of your shadows. Don't be be afraid of employing plenty of light, but give plenty of exposure for those heavy shadows. Remember, always the golden rule of photography. Expose for your (deepest) shadows, and develop for your (brightest) highlights of lighting, a line' lighting. This is made in exactly opposite manner to the other. Our subject is seated the same, except a little farther forward, as most of our light should come from a little behind. Moving the camera correspondingly, we place our subject so that we do not expose the negative to the direct light of the window, but rather to the darker shadow beyond it. Using our reflector more sparingly we use the most brilliant lighting we can obtain, even to direct sunlight. (This last is a test which even your orthochromatic plate cannot stand, but which seems to produce no ill effect on the Portrait Film.)

"Now take your dark cloth as before and subdue your highlight on the nearest shoulder to the window, request absolute quiet from your subject and open your shutter. Give about four to eight counts to this negative and risk movement at any time rather than underexposure. Now we are ready to develop our first attempts.

"There are developers galore on our market to-day, some good and some not so good. You may even have a pet' of your own of which you are very fond and which gives good results in ordinary work. But as a rule the photographer who follows the printed formula is the photographer who gets the best results.

"The development of Portrait Films is comparatively easy either by tank or tray. For either tank or tray development pyro is strongly recommended, experience having taught that the best results are obtained with this agent.

"There is an unbreakable chain, forged of brilliant lights and deepest shadows, which connects the exposure and development of Portrait Films. You must expose for your shadows, and you just as certainly must develop for your highlights. Development must be closely watched, and as soon as your brightest highlight has arrived at the density of the shadow which your finger casts when held about three inches from the negative on the side from which your light comes, it should be quickly rinsed in water and transferred to a strongly acidified fixing bath. Care should be taken not to overdevelop your negative, as you will have plenty of contrast if your light has been brilliant enough to cause deep shadows.

"It is not necessary to develop your negative intensely to obtain detail in your shadows. That is what your reflector is for and it is for you merely to expose for this detail, then to develop for your highlights, letting your shadows take care of themselves. This is automatically done by tank development."

A War Measure StudioLightMagazine1918 242

EASTMAN PORTRAIT FILM NEGATIVE, ARTURA PRINT

By Jerome Chircosta Cleveland, O.

PORTRAIT FILM KITS With the 4 1/4 x 6 1/2 size Portrait Film Kit which has just been added to the sizes already furnished, films may now be used in all the standard sizes of plate holders up to and including by using these kits, Eastman Portrait and Commercial Films may be loaded into the regular view camera type of plate holders as readily as plates. The Portrait Film Kit is a narrow wooden frame, bound with metal at each end. The film lies in the holder and the kit fits against it, holding it firmly on all four sides. The metal ends of the kit fit under the end rabbets of the holder the same as a glass plate.

The use of these kits is a most satisfactory and convenient method of adapting plate holders to the use of film.

THE PRICE

4 1/4

X

6 1/2

Portrait Film Kits, each

$.15

5

X

7

Portrait Film Kits, each

.15

6 1/2

X

8 1/2

Portrait Film Kits, each

.20

8

X

10

Portrait Film Kits, each

.20

7

X

11

Portrait Film Kits, each

.20