It is composed of a closed glass tube, A, Fig. 1, connected by means of a very small lead pipe, B, to another glass tube, C, open at the bottom and having five pieces of platinum wire (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5), which project inside and outside of the tube, fused into one side. This tube is plunged into an ebonite vessel of somewhat larger diameter, which is fastened to the base by a copper screw, E. The tube C is filled to a certain height with mercury and then petroleum. The outer ends of the five platinum wires are soldered to ordinary copper wires and connections made to various points on a rheostat as shown. The diagram, Fig. 2, shows how the connections to the supply current are made.

Automatic Electric Heat Regulator 599

The apparatus operates as follows: The tube is immersed in the matter to be heated, a liquid, for instance. As the temperature of this rises, the air expands and exerts pressure on the petroleum in the tube C so that the level of the mercury is lowered. The current is thus compelled, as the platinum wires with the fall of the mercury are brought out of circuit, to pass through an increasing resistance, until, if necessary, the flow is entirely stopped when the mercury falls below the wire 5.

Wiring Diagram Showing How the Connections to a Source of Current Supply are Made

Wiring Diagram Showing How the Connections to a Source of Current Supply are Made

With this very simple apparatus the temperature can be kept constant within a 10-deg. limit, and it can be made much more sensitive by increasing the number of platinum wires and placing closer together, and by filling the tube A with some very volatile substance, such as ether, for instance. The petroleum above the mercury prevents sparking between the platinum wire and the mercury when the latter falls below anyone of them.