Experimental Apparatus

Experimental Apparatus

Take any kitchen utensil used for frying purposes-an ordinary skillet, or spider, works best-having a smooth inner bottom surface, and turn in water to the depth of 1/2 in. Cut a piece of cardboard circular to fit the bottom of the spider and make a hole in the center 4 in. in diameter. The hole will need to correspond to the size of the can used. It should be 1 in. less in diameter than that of the can. Place this cardboard in the bottom of the spider under the water. A 2-qt. syrup can or pail renders the best demonstration, although good results may be obtained from the use of an ordinary tomato can. The edge of the can must have no indentations, so it will fit perfectly tight all around on the cardboard. Place the can bottom side up and evenly over the hole in the cardboard. Put a sufficient weight on the can to prevent it moving on the cardboard, but not too heavy, say, l lb.

Place the spider with its adjusted contents upon a heated stove. Soon the inverted can will begin to agitate. When this agitation finally ceases remove the spider from the stove, being careful not to move the can, and if the quickest results are desired, apply snow, ice or cold water to the surface of the can until the sides begin to flatten. The spider with its entire contents may now be lifted by taking hold of the can. When the vacuum is complete the sides of the can will suddenly collapse, and sometimes, with a considerable report, jump from the spider.

The cause of the foregoing phenomenon is that the circular hole in the cardboard admits direct heat from the surface of the spider. This heat causes the air in the can to expand, which is allowed to escape by agitation, the water and the cardboard acting as a valve to prevent its re-entrance. When the enclosed air is expelled by the heat and a vacuum is formed by the cooling, the above results are obtained as described. --Contributed by N. J. McLean.