Mutton is, for most, a most nutritious and easily digested meat when of good quality and properly prepared, but it may. be very uninviting through carelessness in cooking and serving. For this reason, no doubt, it is less in favor in this country than beef. Lamb is the name applied to the animal until one year old, after that it is properly mutton. The age is told by the bone of the fore leg, being smooth in the young animal but showing ridges which grow deeper and deeper with age. Mutton and lamb are in season the year round. The best mutton is from an animal not over 5 years old, plump with small bones. Like the beef long curing before consumption is desirable.

The usual cuts of mutton are the leg, loin, shoulder, neck, breast and flank. The leg is, all things considered, the best roast. The fore quarter, or the shoulder boned and rolled as in veal, is an excellent cheap roast, the choice depending on the size of the family. The ribs and loin may be used for roasts for a small family, but are more frequently cut into chops. The rib chops are smallest and, therefore, more expensive. They must, in fact, be regarded as a great luxury, considering the price and the proportion of bone, but they are much in favor for their delicious delicacy and fine flavor. The shoulder, breast, and best part of the neck are excellent for stews, pot pies or for boiling. The portion of the neck nearest the head is tougher and is best used for broth for which it is especially desirable, being rich in flavor and nutriment.

Cuts Of Lamb, U. S. Department Of Agriculture

Cuts Of Lamb, U. S. Department Of Agriculture

Side Of Lamb

Side Of Lamb