The Women Wanted

Domestic help is needed most. For lady helps there is very little demand. But for educated women who can turn their hands to homework, and are not above sweeping and dusting, cooking, washing-up, and helping with children there are thousands of places waiting.

The report in question gives the following table of wage-earning British women in Vancouver:

Clerks and saleswomen...................................

1,250

Book-keepers and stenographers....................

1,200

Trained nurses.................................................

200

Teachers..........................................................

360

Telephone operators.........................................

100

Domestics.........................................................

1,440

Waitresses........................................................

450

Laundresses......................................................

390

Factory workers...............................................

270

Tailoresses and dressmakers.............................

450

6,110

This list gives some idea of the class of work that offers itself to emigrants from these islands. The Y.w.c.a. works in connection with the British Women's Immigration Association. Each month, from March to November, parties of young women arrive at Vancouver, and are accommodated at the Y.w.c.a. annexe until situations are found for them. After November, travelling across the mountains becomes arduous and costly. Great care is taken to find her own particular niehe in life for each girl. Some have been sent as governesses to ranches in the interior of the province, also mothers'-helps - as distinguished from lady-helps - nurses, and housekeepers.

Many of the young women are refined and educated. Some are daughters of clergymen, officers in the services, or of professional men. Applications for helpers in the home come from every part of the province, and almost everywhere these English girls are to be found, sometimes in very rough homes.

The president of the Y.w.c.a. remarks "Men grow ashamed of a careless life when confronted with the quiet voices and gentle manner of these girls." She adds: "There is no greater civilising power than that which a truly good woman wields."

Many of these young women are now happy wives and mothers in homes of their own.

The Civilising Power Of Women

The British Women's Emigration Association does not assist the servant class to emigrate, rightly considering that the various shipping agencies cover that adequately. It prefers to help women and girls of the middle class and gentlewomen who find it difficult to earn a living in England. On arriving in British Columbia, servants marry much more frequently than gentlewomen.

What men want out there is a wife who can work and help to build up the home. A young couple who started married life with twenty dollars bought a small piece of land in the outskirts of Vancouver on the instalment plan, and built a two-room house on it. They now own the land, and have added to the house, making it into a commodious home. A lady-help who was sent to a situation two or three hundred miles up-country married the owner of a large ranche. She has just been supplied by the Y.w.c.a. with a mother's-help to help her in the care of her little child.

Capable Women

A few years ago two sisters applied to be sent into the Dry Belt, as both had a tendency to consumption. They worked so well that they were able to send home for their whole family - the mother, two sisters, and a brother, who lived very poorly in a small town in England. They are together now in one of the prettiest of the little towns in the Okanagen Valley, and are healthy and prosperous, the two young sisters married, and the boy in good employ.

Many women approaching middle age have emigrated to British Columbia, and a number of them have married. A capable woman who can "take hold" is valued in this land, where work, and plenty of it, is the order of the day - sometimes a very long day, too. It is of no use for querulous! grumbling girls and women, with a horror of anything "menial," to go out as emigrants. To begin with, they must prepare to work hard. Easy times may come, and often do.

The Glories Of British Columbia

British Columbia is a beautiful country. The vastness and grandeur of the scenery is unsurpassed. Mr. Julian Ralph wrote of it as "twenty Switzerlands rolled into one." With more than the grandeur of Switzerland, the Columbians have also fiords, as of Norway, running up for miles into the land in deep, clear water, and lichen-covered cliffs, where sea-birds build their nests. And reminiscent of Scotland are the long, calm lakes in the north, studded with little islands. Stunted pines mount guard about the lakes. The clear air gives wonderful effects of colour to sunrise and sunset. One of the British girls received by the Women's Immigration Society stood gazing down the road from Vancouver to the Burrard Inlet, and said, "There is a picture at the end of every street, and they belong to everyone."

Any girl or woman who feels tempted to try a new path in life in beautiful surroundings, and with wider prospects than are possible at home, should apply to the British Women's Emigration Society, Imperial Institute, London, S.w.

Why St. George's, Hanover Square, was the First Church to be Used for Society Weddings

Why St. George's, Hanover Square, was the First Church to be Used for Society Weddings - Where M.p.s in Church Registers - St. Paul's, Knightsbridge-the Guards' Chapel-m.p.s are Married-where Roman Catholic Fashionable Weddings are Solemnised mong London churches, St. George's, Hanover Square, has been more particularly associated with weddings than any other for at least three generations. Mid - Victorian novelists almost invariably sent their heroines to the altar of this church and Punch," a faithful reflector of the times, used St. George's as a synonym for

marriage. Thackeray, in his  Jeames de la Pluche,  made a similar use of the name. In those days there were far fewer very wealthy families than now, and they chiefly lived in the parish of St. George's, in Grosvenor and Cavendish Squares, Park Lane, and the streets leading to them.

marriage. Thackeray, in his "Jeames de la Pluche," made a similar use of the name. In those days there were far fewer very wealthy families than now, and they chiefly lived in the parish of St. George's, in Grosvenor and Cavendish Squares, Park Lane, and the streets leading to them.