the lady and both take rapid chassees to the right and left, pointing

Fig. 2. Step 2. The side step. The gentleman stands behind each foot sharply in turn

Fig. 2. Step 2. The side step. The gentleman stands behind each foot sharply in turn

Children from our treatment. I am often asked if it is possible for a man to look anything but awkward when dancing such an "acrobatic" measure as the Tango. My answer is "Yes." I have seen many men, who have taken the

Fig. 3. Step 3. Stamping step. Correct attitude of the dancers, lady in front, gentleman behind, at the end of the movement

Fig. 3. Step 3. Stamping step. Correct attitude of the dancers, lady in front, gentleman behind, at the end of the movement

Fig. 4. Step 4. Side step. As the dancers move apart, the hands should rise and fall with the movements of the body

Fig. 4. Step 4. Side step. As the dancers move apart, the hands should rise and fall with the movements of the body

The Dance Itself

The Tango is danced to special music, called by the name of the dance; but it can also be performed to a two-step tune. The dance comprises nine distinct steps. These are never danced straight through in sequence, except on the stage; and it is rare for couples in a ballroom to be acquainted with more than one or two. As the

Fig. 5. Step 5. The lady steps back on the right foot, bending backwards over the gentleman's arm, and pointing the left foot

Fig. 5. Step 5. The lady steps back on the right foot, bending backwards over the gentleman's arm, and pointing the left foot

Tango is usually danced, each couple decides that they will stick to a certain step: any one of the nine; so it follows that every other couple is doing something different. If they get tired of one step it is easy for them to break into another, and - though this is a fatal mistake - try and copy the steps done by other dancers. Intending Tango-ers would do well to decide on the step they prefer, and devote all their energies to perfecting it.

The following are the nine steps and introduction:

Introduction. Standing face to face, sideways to the audience, and the width of the room apart, the dancers run forward till they meet in the centre, where they stamp their feet, and strike the attitude illustrated in Fig. 3.

Step 1. Fig. 1. With the lady's right hand in the gentleman's right (and left in left) they travel in a circle to the left, stamping each foot in turn, and scraping the other along the floor, and up into the air. Fig. I shows the position at the end of the circle, just as they are turning to face the audience again.

lady forwards

Fig. 6. Step 6. Turning step. As the dancers turn they perform a glissade, the gentleman moving backwards and the

Fig. 6. Step 6. Turning step. As the dancers turn they perform a glissade, the gentleman moving backwards and the

Fig. 7. Step 7. Backwards and forwards movement, with feet pointed. The step finishes with stamps

Fig. 7. Step 7. Backwards and forwards movement, with feet pointed. The step finishes with stamps

Sixteen stamping steps complete the circle.

Step 2. Fig. 2. Still holding hands as described above, the gentleman steps back and stands behind his partner; then they take a rapid chassee to the right and left, pointing each foot sharply in turn, and getting a decided "dip" with the body as the foot is pointed. This is repeated eight times on opposite sides. Fig. 2 shows the position when the chassee is taken to the left.

Step 3. Fig. 3. This step is again taken in a circle, and consists of a chassee (or polka) step, with hands still crossed. The step is repeated six times, the dancers then facing front. They drop their hands, and do the Spanish "stamps," which occur (like a hornpipe breakdown) at the end of several subsequent steps. Two marked stamps with alternate feet are followed by five rapid ones, ending with the raising of the arms and striking the position illustrated in Fig. 3.

at the end of the first turning step, feet raised, arms extended.

Fig. 8. Step 8. Back to back (turning) movement. Position

Fig. 8. Step 8. Back to back (turning) movement. Position

Stamps conclude the dance in the position shown in Fig. 3

Step 4. Fig. 4. This step is somewhat like step 2, but the dancers move in opposite directions, instead of the same way. The lady starts by placing her right foot over and pointing her left, while her partner does the reverse. So they move apart, still holding hands, which must rise and fall with the movements of the body. This "cross-over" step is repeated six times, followed by the stamps, as above.

Step 4A. This step consists of an ordinary pas de basque, danced in a circle, with the right hands only joined, and being lifted high or dropped low, as alternate feet are used. After six repetitions of the steps and the completion of the circle, the stamps are repeated.

Step 5. Fig. 5. Joining both hands again, the dancers walk three steps straightforward, starting with the left foot; the lady points her right foot, then steps quickly back on the same foot, bending backwards over the gentleman's arm, and leaving the left foot pointed.

This is a particularly effective step, and typical of the "Tango Argentin." The steps and back-bend are repeated three times; and the stamps, smartly executed, complete the step. Fig. 5 illustrates the back-bend.

Step 6. Fig. 6. Taking a big step across with the right foot the dancers turn slowly, performing a glissade, the gentleman moving backwards and the lady forward. The step is then repeated on the opposite side. Fig. 6 shows the dancers turning. The step is repeated four times.

Step 7. Fig. 7. Standing sideways to the audience, the dancers hold hands as in an ordinary round dance, and take a big step forward, drawing their heels together, raising their arms, and bending back. This is followed by a big step back, taken with a dip, the hands and bodies being drawn and bent down and forward as the feet are pointed (see Fig. 7).

After repeating this movement three times the stamps finish the step.

Step S. Fig. 8. Starting face to face the dancers take a chassee with the right foot; then make one half-turn and a whole turn, on alternate feet, turning back and away from each other with outstretched arms, and finishing back to back. Fig. 8 illustrates the position at end of turn. The step is then repeated, finishing face to face the second time. It is then danced once more, the dancers concluding back to back; then, turning sharply forward and performing the stamps, ending the dance in the striking position shown in Fig. 3.

As there are nine steps but only eight illustrations the step really numbered 5 has been called 4a, in order to avoid confusion in the steps and figures following.

As few children dance the Tango, Mrs. Wordsworth specially instructed one of her pupils in this dance, and kindly allowed her to pose for the pictures accompanying this article.