Outward Back Twist (B) (Fig. 2). Left hand. Raise the left hand till over the left shoulder, knuckles level with and about 2 inches from the ear, the club inclined slightly backwards. Start the circle by bending the wrist back and to the left, so that the knuckles are on top. This allows the club to swing to the left and down behind the shoulder; then let the circle continue upwards behind the head to the starting position. A circle has now been made behind the left shoulder and the head with the wrist as the centre point. The hand must not be moved from its position close to the ear, and the wrist must be quite loose, so that the club can twist and turn it in doing the circle. Repeat this circle four times. To get the right direction, stand with the back to a wall, about 9 inches from it, and make the end of the club touch the wall throughout the circle.

This twist may also be done with the hand about 12 or 14 inches from the ear - Outward Back Twist at half distance (B') - or with the arm straight at shoulder level - Outward Back Twist at full distance (B"). In this last circle the wrist is not bent, it is turned so that the fingers are uppermost. The club is then swung round in the hand, the fingers straightening as the club drops to its lowest point, closing as it comes up. (See Fig. 3.)

Fig. 4. Left Hand. Outward back swing <D). Just before completion of 3rd quarter, showing practice against a wall. Right hand. Outward cross inside twist K, just before completion of 1st quarter of circle. N.b. This photograph does not depict a combined exercise. The two circles are not being swung together

Fig. 4. Left Hand. Outward back swing <D). Just before completion of 3rd quarter, showing practice against a wall. Right hand. Outward cross inside twist K, just before completion of 1st quarter of circle. N.b. This photograph does not depict a combined exercise. The two circles are not being swung together

Outward Cross Front Twist (C) (Fig 3). Right hand. Place the right hand in front of the left breast, the club pointing upwards and slightly inclined forwards. Start by bending the hand back towards the arm, so that the fingers are uppermost; at the same time let the fingers begin to open. This allows the end of the club to descend to the right. When the club is at its lowest point, the fingers will be quite straight, but still in contact with the club, and the club will touch the root of the thumb. (See Fig. 3, right hand.) As the club ascends, the fingers close. It is important that the club should be held close up between the base of the thumb and first finger, which should both grip the club firmly. The club actually twists in the socket so formed, the fingers only con-trolling the movement. Practise this circle facing a wall, 9 inches from it.

This circle may also be made at half distance (C), when the shoulders must be slightly turned (left shoulder back), or at full distance (C"). Outward Back Swing (D) (Fig. 4). Left hand. For this swing a turn must be made on the heels. Raise the toes from the ground and pivot on the heels a quarter of a circle to the left till the left foot points directly forward and the right foot is at right angles to it. Now, from the "Carry," straighten the left arm until the hand is above and inclined a little outward from the left shoulder, the fingers being forward, and the club in line with the arm. Now swing the club forwards, downwards, backwards, and upwards to the starting position. Allow the body to turn with the swing of the club, and be sure to keep the back of the hand uppermost when the arm is horizontal. This swing should be parallel to the outward front swing. To ensure this, stand with the back about 9 inches from a wall, turn on the heels and proceed, making the club describe a circle on the wall. (Fig. 4 shows left hand practising against wall.)

The picturesque old Highland custom of bringing the stag home at old Balmoral Castle. Their Scottish home has been very dear to our Royal Family, since Queen Victoria decided to become a Highland chieftainess. The Castle is full of tender memories and sweet associations, whilst ancient customs there are cherished carefully

The picturesque old Highland custom of bringing the stag home at old Balmoral Castle. Their Scottish home has been very dear to our Royal Family, since Queen Victoria decided to become a Highland chieftainess. The Castle is full of tender memories and sweet associations, whilst ancient customs there are cherished carefully

From the painting by Carl Haag