The marriage of Lord Craven, in 1893, to T the daughter of those fabulously rich Americans, Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Martin, was one of the social sensations of that year. The Countess had not then reached her seventeenth year, and, according to a pretty story, her hair was "put up" for the first time on the bridal morning. The union has been a most happy one, and Lady Craven has developed a dignity, a charm of manner, and an adaptability to English customs which have won her distinction. Indeed, she is regarded as one of the most successful of political hostesses, and her reception, in March, 1912, at Chesterfield Gardens, when the whole of the Ministry, the members of the Diplomatic Service, and many prominent politicians were present, was the event of the season. The Countess, however, is more fond of country than town life, and is devoted to her beautiful home in Warwickshire, Combe Abbey, which is one of the most interesting old houses in Britain. She is interested in chicken farming, and her fowls are the most choice and valuable in England, except, perhaps, the Countess of Derby's Orpingtons, which are the envy of all chicken fanciers. The Countess has one child, a son, Viscount Uffington, who was born in 1897.

Lady Craven Central News

Lady Craven Central News