The Shield

The Shield 48

Fig. 1.

The Shield 49

Fig. 2.

The Shield 50

Fig. 3.

The Shield is almost identical with the Escutheon; there is, however, a slight difference, which forms a little variety and practice in the art of napkin-folding.

First form fig. 1, as for the Escutcheon. Next roll up the two ends in the manner shown in fig. 2; that is, make the rolls outwardly, not under as in the previous direction. The serviette will now resemble fig. 3. Then set it into form, and place the bread inside. The face of it will stand perfectly upright and resemble figure 4.

The Shield 51

Fig. 4.

The Mitre

The Mitre is a well-known device, and one which always looks effective It is not unlike the Crown. Fold the damask in half, and turn down the two corners to meet at both ends, in the manner shown in fig. 1, taking care to let them meet very exactly and not overlap. Fold it in half at the line A to B, fig. 1, to ascertain the centre. Open this last fold again and bring the two points to the centre like fig. 2. Fold these together at the dotted line with the points out side, let down one of these corners again, and turn in the two points A and B also, to make a triangle uniform with the others: it will now resemble fig. 3. Turn the serviette over; let down the point on that side: it will then resemble fig. 4. Turn in the corners A and B, by the line marked. Turn up the point D to its former position: it will now resemble fig. 5. Slip the hand inside the hollow to be found . at the broad end, and shape it like a cap, and the Mitre is complete.

The Mitre 52

Fig. 1.

The Mitre 53

Fig. 2.

The Mitre 54

Fig. a.

The Mitre 55

Fig. 4.

The Mitre 56

Fig. 5.

The Mitre 57

Fig. 6.

The Cornucopia

Cornucopias are easily folded, and very effective down a long dinner table, with a single scarlet geranium flower at the apex of each. Halve the serviette lengthways; turn down the corners at the two ends to meet in the centre and form a triangle, like fig. 4, in the Crown.

Take the corners at the base and bring them to the apex, like fig. 1. Then double it together with folds inside: it will now appear like fig. 2. At the side marked A, there are three folds. Set it upright over the dinner roll, with two of these folds one side and one on the other. Shape it nicely, keeping the space from B to C close.

The Crown

This is a handsome design, and is one which requires very well starched damask. The bread is placed inside, underneath the crown. Now that flowers are so much used, nothing could have a more charming effect than a slight wreath of flowers round the base of it, at the part marked A to B, in fig. 1. Fig. 2 represents the serviette laid on the table. Fold it exactly in half from A to B, open and fold the reverse way, from C to D. Open it again. These creases are merely made to ascertain the true centre. As it lies, turn all the points to the centre, and crease down in the manner observed in fig. 3, which forms a diamond. Take the four corners of the diamond and fold them to the centre again. The serviette will still preserve the shape shown in diagram fig. 3, but be smaller in size.

The Crown 58

Fig. 1.

The Crown 59

Fig. 2.

The Crown 60

Fig. 3.

The Crown 61

Fig. 1.

The Crown 62

Fig. 2.

The Crown 63

Fig. 3.

Bring the top, A, to the right hand, B, and the left hand, B, to the other, A; it will now resemble fig. 4. Fold down the corners, E F and G H, parallel to the line I J; it will now resemble fig. 5. Put the hand inside it at the broad end, and shape it like a cap, over the hand, folding one end into the other as shown at C, in fig. 5. The stiffness of the damask should be sufficient to keep these last folds in place; the corner fold should just be turned one corner within the other as an envelope, and pinched, to secure its remaining firm.

The Crown 64

Fig. 4.

The Crown 65

Fig. 5.