E. To determine the effect of varying the proportion of ingredients.

1. Increase the fat to 100 grams or 1/2 cup and the water to 6 grams more for the full recipe than that found best under A. Use bread flour and butter. Mix the water with the fat and flour with the number of strokes found best under B.

2. Repeat E1, but use hydrogenated cottonseed oil.

3. Repeat E1, but use lard.

4. Repeat E1, but use oil.

5. Repeat E1, but use hydrogenated lard.

F. Decrease the fat in the full recipe to 50 grams or 1/4 cup. Use all-purpose flour and any fat desired. Use the proportion of water found best under A. Mix with the number of strokes found best under B.

Experiment 96

To determine the effect of the temperature of the ingredients when mixed upon the texture and tenderness of pastry.

1. Use all-purpose flour and lard. Use the proportion of water found best under 95A, and mix with the number of strokes found best under 95B. Use ice water and chilled fat.

2. Prepare twice the quantity used in the other experiments. Repeat 1, but have the water boiling. Add the fat and stir until the fat is melted. Then add the flour and salt and mix with the number of strokes found best under 95B. Divide in two portions. Roll and bake one part. Use the other portion for 3.

3. Chill the dough remaining from 2 before rolling.

4. Repeat 1, but melt the fat before cutting into the flour.

Which gives the flakiest pastry? Is the pastry made with hot water difficult to roll unless chilled? What is the effect of melting the fat upon the texture of the pastry?

Experiment 97

To determine the effect of mixing by different methods and continued rolling upon pastry.

1. Repeat Experiment 96,1, but prepare twice the quantity used in the other experiments. Roll and bake half the dough. Use the other portion for 2.

2. Reroll the dough remaining from 97,1, four or five times and bake. Compare with 97,1, for flakiness and tenderness.

3. Use all-purpose flour and lard. Use the proportion of water found best under 95A. Put all the ingredients in the mixing bowl together. Then cut with knives until the dough is the consistency to roll. Compare with other methods of mixing.

4. Use all-purpose flour and lard. Mix the fat very thoroughly with the flour. Use the proportion of water found best under 95A. Add the water and mix with the number of strokes found best under 95B.

5. Repeat 97,4, but cut the fat into the flour with only a few strokes, leaving the fat and flour coarsely flaked.

6. Decrease the fat in the full recipe to 40 grams. Use all-purpose flour and the proportion of water found best under 95A. Mix with the number of strokes found best under 95B. After rolling the dough add 5 grams of fat in small flakes over half the rolled dough. Fold the dough and reroll. Add 5 more grams of fat and reroll. Bake.

What is the effect of rolling the dough several times upon the tenderness of the pastry? Its flakiness? Can a good pastry be obtained by combining all the ingredients at one time? Does adding a portion of the fat while rolling increase the flakiness of the pastry? Its tenderness?