1. Remnants of cooked meat may be stewed, either by themselves, or with uncooked meat.

2. Only the best portions of stew meat should be browned; very coarse or gristly pieces may be simmered by themselves, and only the broth added to the stew.

3. To make sure that the stew shall not boil, cook it in a double boiler, allowing half again as much time as for cooking by direct heat. Stew meat that has boiled may look tender because its fibres, loosened by the softening of the connective tissue, fall apart; but the fibres themselves will be found hard to chew and digest.

4. In stewing, add water from time to time, enough to keep the meat covered. If the broth is too watery, boil it down before pouring it over the meat.

5. Braised meat may be cooked uncovered the latter part of the time.

Plate IX.

Top Sirloin ready for Roasting.

Top Sirloin ready for Roasting.

Leg of Mutton. (Hind.)

Leg of Mutton. (Hind.)

Forequarter Of Mutton. (Rib portion sep arated from shoulder)

Forequarter Of Mutton. (Rib portion sep-arated from shoulder)

Rolled Flank of Beef, larded, braised, and arranged on a Bed of Vegetables.

Rolled Flank of Beef, larded, braised, and arranged on a Bed of Vegetables.