Plant-life may be considered under three general denominations. Some species are annual, or rather semiannual, living from spring only to the close of the autumn of the same year; others are biennial, living to the close of the second autumn, but never beyond it; the greater part are perennial, or competent to live for a long series of years. Annuals include many of the commoner garden-flowers and culinary vegetables, which require to be freshly raised from seed every season ; biennials are likewise common in gardens ; perennials comprise all those herbaceous plants which form the staple vegetation of a country, withering, to a certain extent, during winter, and even dying down to the roots, but starting afresh with the return of spring ; also all trees and shrubs, whether deciduous or evergreen. The perennials exhibit as great diversity in lease of life as the different species of animals. Some decay in as few as four or five years ; others, often remarkable for their odoriferous and balsamic qualities, as sage, balm, and lavender, endure for ten or more ; next come the larger and robuster kind of shrubs, as rhododendrons and azaleas; then such trees as are of rapid growth, and the substance of which is soft, as the poplar and willow; and lastly, those mighty, slow-growing, solid-wooded pillars of the forest, as the cedar and oak, at whose feet whole nations rise and fall.

How vast are the periods of life allotted to longaeval trees may be judged from the following list of ages known to have been reached by patriarchs of the respective kinds named:

Years

Cercis..........

......... 300

Elm............

........ 335

Ivy

........... .450

Maple .....

............. ...516

Larch

.......... ...576

Orange

....................630

Cypress

....................800

Olive

....................800

Years

Walnut

.... 900

Oriental Plane

.... 1000

Lime

.... 1100

Spruce

____ 12 0

Oak

____ 1500

Cedar

.... 2000

Schubertia

___ 3000

Yew

.... 3200

Four and five thousand years are assigned to Taxodium and Adansonia, and Von Martius describes locust trees in the South American forests which he believes to have begun their quasi-immortality in the days of Homer. Whether or no, it may safely be asserted that the world possesses at this moment living memorials of antiquity at least as old as the most ancient monuments of human art. How grand and solemn is even the thought of a tree coeval with the pyramids of Egypt and the sculptures of Nineveh, yet still putting forth leaves, and inviting the birds to come and "sing among the branches!"-The Garden.