In response to a question from an anxious small fruit grower how to manage his strawberries, the Western Rural gives him this byway, as a table of commandments:

Set out in the spring good strong plants, upon deeply plowed, and if possible, new land, in rows three feet apart by twelve inches in the row. Keep the ground thoroughly clean, and the runners cut off as fast as they appear during the season. Do not allow them to bear the first season, since the crop will not pay you, and it will weaken the plants. Pinch off the blossoms as they appear.

About the time the ground freezes up, cover the bed about three inches thick with slough hay, or some other clean material. When the vines really show signs of growth, not before, uncover the plants along the rows, allowing the mulch to remain between the rows, until after they have fruited.

Having . done as above, you should get a full crop of the finest berries. The mulch not only keeps the soil moist, and the berries from contact with the earth, but its principal value in the spring, besides protecting the plants in winter, is to keep back growth early in the season, thereby retarding the blossoming until danger of frosts are over.

Many persons imagine (hat it is better to let the runners grow, but with some varieties this will tie the case to such a degree, as to prevent their fruiting, and such vines are always non-paying. It really costs less to clean and pick the crops under the hill system, than under the old fashioned one of letting them run.

PLAN OF COUNTRY COTTAGE.

PLAN OF COUNTRY COTTAGE.

PLAN OF FIRST FLOOR.

PLAN OF FIRST FLOOR.

Successful Culture Of Strawberries 280029