The Campanula Vidalli

Is recommended as a perfect gem for the greenhouse. It is a low growing plant, with racemes of pure white bcll-shupcd flowers.

Camphor Vs. Pea-Bugs

Having observed in the Horticulturist an inquiry relative to seed peas damaged by bags, I will offer a remedy, perhaps not new, but new to me. Four years ago last spring my seed peas were more than half destroyed by bugs, the largest and best varieties being most injured. The summer following I had boxes made, one for each variety, with a cover; and when the peas were gathered, I put into each box, with two quarts of peas, from six to eight bits of gum camphor, the size of a large pea, and mixed them together, and closed the box. The next spring there was not a pea injured. I have pursued the same course every year since, and have not had one pea affected by bugs. J. Beret. - Channahon, Ill.

Campsidium Filicifolium

A free-growing slender woody climber, from the Feejee Islands, and referred doubtfully to Campsidium, from the analogy of its foliage. It has opposite imparipinnate leaves, which are about five inches long, including a petiole of one inch, and consists of nine pairs of leaflets, which are small, ovate, deeply cut into two or three lobes on each side, the larger lobes being sometimes also toothed. The leaves, from their size and form, are strongly suggestive of fronds of some small-growing pinnate Asplenium, A. viride, for example.

The growth and general character of the plant is so elegant that, whether cultivated as a small pot plant, trained on globular or other trellises, or planted as a climber, it has a most charming and engaging appearance. The flowers are as yet unknown. It has received first-class certificates both from the Royal Horticultural and Royal Botanic Societies. - William Bull.

Campxidium Filictfolium

A free-growing slender woody climber, from the Feejee Islands, and referred doubtfully to Campsidium, from the analogy of its foliage. It has opposite imparipinnate leaves, which are about five inches long, including a petiole of one inch, and consist of nine pairs of leaflets, which are small, ovate, deeply cut into two or three lobes on each side, the larger lobes being sometimes also toothed. The leaves, from their size and form, are strongly suggestive of fronds of some small-growing pinnate Asplenium, A. viride, for example. The growth and general character of the plant is so elegant that whether cultivated as a small pot-plant, trained on globular or other trellises, or planted as a climber, it has a most charming and engaging appearance. The flowers are as yet unknown.

Campylobotris Argyroneura. Nat. Ord. Rubiaceoe

A charming little species, growing six or eight inches high, and closely allied to C. Discolor, but distinguished by the silvery nervures of the leaf, the edges of which are (especially in the case of the young ones) margined with rose, and fringed with ciliaea of the same color; their upper surface is of a fine olive or brownish green, with a satiny appearance. It will be cultivated chiefly for its beauty as a plant with ornamental foliage. From Chiapas, where it was detected through the indefatigable zeal of Mr. Ghiesbreght. - Ibid.