Specimens of this and the two succeeding varieties, were exhibited at the late meeting of the Society at Rochester, by Mr. S. P. Carpenter, of New Rochelle, New York, and were noticed in the Report of the Native Fruit Committee, but not minutely described. Since the adjournment of the Society, other specimens, through the kindness of Mr. Carpenter, have been received, and examined, and a visit to the original trees has been made by a member of the Committee.

The Huntington was fonnd growing in the woods, and, while small, was taken up by the late James Hnntington, Esq., of New Rochelle, and planted in front of his residence. The tree is now twenty or thirty years old, and pyramidal in its growth. Having been planted in a shallow, stony piece of ground, it does not appear to thrive well, although it produces fruit of an excellent quality.

Size, rather under medinm, 2 inches long by 2 and 5-16ths broad. Form, roundish-obovate, broad at the crown, tapering to the base, sometimes resembling in appearance the Vesouziere. Skin, yellow, with a number of russet dots, andnotunfreqnent-lyaredcheek. Stem, from five-eighths to one inch long by one-eighth thick, inserted in a moderately open cavity, which occasionally is quite wide and shallow. Calyx, rather large, set in a wide, not very deep basin. Core, medium.Seed,dark brown, obovate, five-sixteenths of an inch long, three-sixteenths broad, one-eighth thick. Flesh, fine texture, and buttery. Flavor, slightly vinons, with a peculiar, delicate aroma. Quality, "very good." Maturity, middle of September.

Hnntington Pear. Chnroh Pear.

Hnntington Pear. Chnroh Pear.