Viburnum

Important additions have been made to this genus, notably in coriaceum, an evergreen growing up to fifteen feet high, with creamy flowers; Davidii, a dwarf evergreen with ovate coriaceous greenish brown leaves, white or blush flowers in corymbs and small oval blue berries; Henryi, an evergreen with glossy lanceolate leaves which produces panicles of coral fruit in autumn; phlebo-trichum, deciduous, white flowers in corymbs in spring, scarlet fruit in autumn; rhytidophyllum, a noble evergreen with magnificent foliage, dark green above, downy below, yellowish flowers in corymbs and dark red berries, First-class Certificate from the Royal Horticultural Society; theiferum, resembling phlebotrichum, but larger throughout; utile, an evergreen with corymbs of white flowers in early spring; see the Botanical Magazine, T. 8174; buddleifolium, long wrinkled leaves; Sargentii, remarkable for its very large leaves; and Carlesii, white or blush fragrant flowers, one of the best of the newer kinds.

One of the best of the snowball trees. Viburnum plicatum. Photo by R. A. Malby.

Fig. One of the best of the snowball trees. Viburnum plicatum. Photo by R. A. Malby.

Vitis

The vines are supplemented by armata, a dense grower which colours well in autumn; armata Veitchii, a splendid variety of brilliant colour; flexuosa Wilsonii, bronzy foliage, crimson on the under surface; Henryana, green leaves (red in autumn) with white veins and midribs; leeoides, pinnate leaves, red above, green below; megalophylla, a rapid grower with enormous leaves; and sinensis, a species with bright green leaves that vary a good deal in form.

A Remarkable New Vine. Vitis Henryana. Photo by R. A. Malby.

Fig. A Remarkable New Vine. Vitis Henryana. Photo by R. A. Malby.