This is a complaint chiefly affecting girls, and occasionally young married women. The skin, lips, tongue and mucous surfaces generally are pale, and the whole surface of the body appears bloodless. Sometimes the face is yellowish, and has a waxen aspect. Sometimes the face looks swelled, the skin appears transparent, and the legs and feet swell. The patient is usually feeble, and cannot bear much exertion; the circulation is weak, and palpitation of the heart is a frequent symptom. The patient frequently complains of headache, dizziness and faintness, pains in the head and costiveness. The appetite is irregular, the breath offensive; the complexion gradually becomes of a yellowish or greenish hue, and dark circles frequently form around the eyes. The immediate causes of this disease are usually want of air and exercise, unwholesome or indigestible food, grief, disappointment in love, and mental anxieties of all kinds. Organic diseases of the stomach, bowels, liver, spleen and heart, sometimes predispose to the complaint, also miasmatic fevers, and chronic disease of the spleen.

Treatment

Attention must be given to the cause of the complaint, and the proper remedies adopted. If the complaint arises from a disordered state of the stomach and bowels, the following pill will be of benefit:-

Socotrine Aloes.........................One Dram.

Powdered Gum Myrrh................Half a Dram.

Extract of Henbane..,................Half a Dram.

Oil of Cloves............................Fifteen drops.

Mix and divide into 30 pills, two of which may be taken every night or every second night.

If the system generally appears out of order, the following may be given with advantage:-

Steel Wine...............................One Ounce.

Tincture of Peruvian Bark..........One Ounce.

Tincture of Gentian...................One Ounce.

Tincture of Orange Peel.............Half an Ounce.

Syrup.....................................One Ounce.

Water....................................Two Ounces.

Mix together. A teaspoonful may be taken in a little water three times a day. Sponging from head to foot every morning when the weather is not too cold, and rubbing dry afterwards with a rather rough towel; plenty of air and exercise, and a good nourishing diet, will be of advantage.

Sir Henry Marsh recommends the following mode of taking iron:-

Sulphate of Iron, dried and powdered, from one to five grains.

Tartaric acid, ten grains.

Powdered White Sugar, half a dram. This powder should be kept in a dry place. When it is to be taken, fifteen grains of Bi-carbonate of Soda is to be added, and the whole dissolved in a wineglassful of water and taken while effervescing. He also adds:-"There are individual constitutions so intolerant of iron, so peculiarly affected by it, that we are compelled altogether to forego the administration of this useful remedy. Some patients cannot endure it, except in quantities insufficient to effect a cure. We are in consequence compelled to look about for a substitute, and the most efficient one is probably Bismuth. Under the use of this metal, gradual and satisfactory cures have resulted. The patient may take the Subnitrate of Bismuth in doses of 5 grains, two or three times a day: or the Subcarbonate of Bismuth in doses of 10 or 15 grains, either made into Pills, or in a little water. Carbonate of Ammonia and the salts of Peruvian Bark are also of value." They may be taken in doses of 2 or 3 grains of Ammonia with one or two grains of Quinine twice or three times a day.