Antispasmodics

Remedies against spasm.

Anus

The termination or verge of the rectum, serving as an outlet for the faeces.

Aperients

Mild purgatives.

Aphonia

Loss of speech or voice, without fainting or insensibility.

Articulation

The mechanism by which the bones of the skeleton are connected with each other.

Asphyxia

Suspended animation; apparent death.

Asthenia

Debility; want of strength.

Astringents

Remedies which contract the animal fibre; and arrest fluxes, haemorrhages, diarrhoea, etc.

Attenuation

Emaciation.

Auscultation

The act of listening by the application of the ear to some part of the body in the examination of disease; either by the ear alone, or by the aid of the stethoscope.

Axilla

The arm-pit. Axillary, belonging to the arm-pit.

Bi-Carbonates

Salts containing a double proportion of Carbonic Acid Gas.

Cachexia

A bad habit of body.

Calefacients

Medicines which excite warmth.

Calorifacients

Substances supposed to generate heat in the animal system, as fat, starch, etc.

Calculus

A solid concretion found in various parts of the human body, and commonly called stone or gravel.

Caries

Ulceration of the bones.

Carcinoma

The Greek term for Cancer.

Cardiac

Relating to the heart.

Carminatives

Remedies which dispel flatulency, and allay pain of the stomach and bowels.

Cartilage

Gristle.

Cataplasm

A poultice.

Cathartics

Medicines which act upon the bowels. They are called laxative, when mild; purgative, when active; and drastic, when very violent.

Caustic

A substance which destroys parts by chemically decomposing them.

Cicatrix

A scar; the mark left after the healing of a wound or ulcer.

Clinical

A term applied to lectures given at the bedside.

Colliquative

A term applied to any excessive evacuation, as diarrhoea or sweating.

Collyrium

Eye-water.

Coma

Drowsiness, dead sleep, torpor.

Comatose

Affected with coma or drowsiness.

Congenital

Born with. A term applied to diseases or pecu-larities of formation existing before birth.

Congestion

Undue fulness of the blood-vessels.

Contagious

Capable of being communicated by contact.

Copperas

Sulphate of Iron or Green Vitriol.

Cordials

Warm medicines.

Counter-Irritation

The production of an artificial or secondary disease, in order to relieve another or primary one.

Crepitation

The grating sensation or noise, occasioned by pressing the finger upon a part affected with emphysema; or by the ends of a fracture when moved.

Crucial

Crosswise.

Crudities

Undigested substances in the stomach.

Cutaneous

Belonging to the skin.

Cuticle

The epidermis or scarf-skin.

Cutis

The derma or true skin.

Deglutition-The act of swallowing.

Deliquescence

The property of some salts of becoming liquid by attracting moisture from the air.

Demulcents

Softening and diluting medicines,

Deobstruents

Medicines which remove obstructions.

Deodorizer

A substance which corrects or destroys foul smells.

Desiccation

The operation of drying.

Desquamation

The falling off of the cuticle in the form of scales.

Detergents

Substances which cleanse wounds, ulcers, etc.

Dextrine

Mucilaginous Starch, prepared by boiling a solution of starch with a few drops of Sulphuric Acid.

Diagnosis

The act of discerning or distinguishing; the distinction of diseases.

Diaphoresis

Increased perspiration.

Diarrhoea

A flux; looseness in the bowels.

Diathesis

Constitutional disposition.

Diuresis

A copious flow of urine.

Diluents

Watery liquors, which increase the fluidity of the blood.

Discutients

Substances which possess the power of dispers-ingtumours.

Disinfectants

Substances which destroy infections.

Disinfection

The purification of infected air.

Diuretics

Medicines which increase the flow of urine.

Dossil

A piece of lint rolled up in a cylindrical form.

Douche

Affusion, a stream of fluid made to fall upon some part of the body.

Dry Cupping

The application of a cupping-glass without drawing blood.

Dura Mater

The outermost membrane of the brain.

Dysmenorrhcea

Difficult or painful menstruation.

Dyspepsia

Indigestion.

Dyspncea

Difficult respiration, short of breath.

Dysuria

Suppression, or difficulty in voiding urine.

Ebullition

The boiling or bubbling of liquids,

Ecchymosis

Extravasted blood, from bruises.

Efflorescence

An eruption of the skin.

Effluvia

Exhalations, vapours, etc.

Encysted

Tumours which consist of matters contained in a sack or bag.

Endemic

Diseases peculiar to the inhabitants of particular countries, native diseases.

Engorgement

An over-fulness of the vessels of a part.

Eneuresis

Involuntary discharge of urine.

Epigastrium

The upper part of the abdomen.

Epispastics

Blisters.

Epistaxis

Bleeding from the nose.

Epithelium

The outer skin on the red part of the lips, and on the mucous membranes in general.

Erosion

Destruction by ulceration.

Errhines

Medicines which cause sneezing, as snuff, etc.

Erysipelas

An eruptive fever, called the Rose, or St. Anthony's Fire.