Liniment, No. 42

Spirit of Ammonia...........................Half an Ounce.

Powdered Gum Camphor....................One Dram.

Palm Oil.........................................Two Ounces

In preparing this Embrocation, the Camphor must be powdered by pouring on it a few drops of Alcohol, which will enable it to be rubbed to a fine powder; it must then be mixed with the Palm Oil, and the Ammonia added, a few drops at a time. When the Palm Oil is of good quality, and fragrant, as it should be, this makes a very pleasant preparation.

Liniment, No. 43

Soap Liniment................................Two Ounces.

Spirit of Rosemary.,.........................One Ounce.

This Liniment is mildly stimulating.

Liniment, No. 44

Tincture of Opium (Laudanum)......Two Drams.

Soap Liniment (Opodeldoc)............An Ounce and a Half.

This is sedative, and very slightly stimulating.

Liniment, No. 45

Soap Liniment.......................An Ounce and a Half.

Camphorated Spirit................Half an Ounce.

Tincture of Cantharides (Spanish Fly). Half an Ounce. This is more stimulating than No. 43.

Liniment, No. 46

Soap Liniment...............................One Ounce.

Laudanum.....................................Two Drams.

Spirit of Rosemary.........................Half an Ounce.

Tincture of Cantharides..................Two Drams.

This Preparation is not quite so stimulating as No. 45, and is a little sedative.

Mustard Liniment, No. 47

By steeping Flour of Mustard in Spirits of Turpentine, (an Ounce of Mustard to three quarters of a Pint of Turpentine), for about twelve hours, shaking it up occasionally, and then straining it off, a strong stimulating Liniment may be made, which will be found useful in Rheumatism, or other cases where a strong Embrocation is required, such as sore throat or Chilblains; but it must never be applied where the skin is broken, or at all tender.

Gargle, No. 48

Powdered Nitre.................................One Dram.

Tincture of Myrrh..............................Half an Ounce.

Infusion of Roses, or Mint Tea...............Half a Pint.

This is a useful Gargle for an inflamed sore throat; it may be used five or six times a day, or oftener.

Gargle, No. 49

Tincture of Capsicum.....................Three Drams.

Infusion of Roses, or Mint Tea..........Half a Pint.

This is a good stimulant Gargle, and may be used, after the previous Gargle (No. 48) has subdued the inflammation,to strengthen the tone of the parts.

Gargle, No. 50

Permanganate of Potash.....................Five Grains.

Water.............................................Half a Pint,

This Gargle has been highly recommended for its success in Diphtheria.

Collyrium, (Eye-Water), No. 51

Solution of Sugar of Lead, (Liq. Plumb. Acet.) ....Twenty Drops.

Wine of Opium...............................................Twenty Drops.

Distilled Rose Water or Rain Water...................Two Ounces.

This preparation is sedative, and is intended to be used for the purpose of subduing inflammation. It may be used several times in the course of the day. After the inflammation is subdued, and nothing but weakness remains, the Eye may be strengthened by using the following:

Collyrium, No. 52

Sulphate of Zinc................................Ten Grains.

Distilled Rose Water, or Rain Water__Two Ounces.

Cooling Lotion, No. 53

Powdered Muriate of Ammonia, (Sal Ammoniac)...Two Drams. Water...........................................................One Pint, Mix.

Cooling Lotion, No. 54

Alcohol...........................................One Ounce.

Vinegar...........................................Three Ounces.

Water, sufficient to make...................Two Pints.

Cooling Lotion, No. 55

Powdered Nitre..............................Two Drams.

Alcohol.........................................Half an Ounce.

Water...........................................One Pint.

Styptic, To Stop Bleeding, No. 56

Alcohol..........................................................Four Ounces.

Tannic Acid, as much as the Alcohol will dissolve ....Mix.

Then add Collodion.............................................Four Ounces.

This must be kept well corked. The Collodion may be obtained at any Photographer's. This is similar to Dr. Richardson's preparation, which is now extensively used by the medical profession.

Black Wash, No. 57

Calomel...........................................One Dram.

Lime Water.....................................Half a Pint. Mix.

Always shake the bottle before using.

Lime Water, No. 58

Fresh burnt Quick Lime..................Four Ounces.

Boiling Water................................One Gallon.

Pour the boiling water on the lime ; stir it up ; then cover it over with a thick cloth; let it stand for six hours. Then pour off the clear liquor, and bottle it for use. Keep the bottle well corked.

Corrageen, Or Irish Moss Jelly, No. 59

This is a nice preparation for sick people. Soak the Moss over night. Then pick out all the nice white pieces, and throw the rest away. Put the picked Moss into a clean saucepan, with sufficient water, and gently simmer it down till it is thick enough, when it can be flavoured to suit the patient's taste. Any scum that rises to the top must be skimmed off.

Hair Restorative, No. 60

Sulphate of Copper......................Twenty Grains.

Honey.......................................One Ounce.

Essence of Bergamot.....................Twenty Drops.

Water........................................Haifa Pint. Mix.

When the hair has fallen off or become thinned in consequence of sickness, Fevers, Ringworm, Blisters, etc, this application will generally cause a new growth of hair. It may be rubbed in for ten or fifteen minutes, night and morning.

Seidlitz Powders, No. 61

Rochelle Salt, in powder, two drams, Bicarbonate of Soda, 40 grains. Mix. Dissolve this in half a tumbler of water. Then dissolve 35 grains of Tartaric Acid in a quarter of a tumbler of water; pour one into the other, and drink while effervescing.

The Doses Of Medicines And The Weights And Measures Used In Prescribing Them

The weight used in prescribing Medicines is called Apothecaries Weight) and is divided as follows:

20 grains make one scruple. 3 scruples or 60 grains make one dram. 8 drams or 480 grains make one ounce. 12 ounces or 5760 grains make one pound.

In measuring liquids:

60 minims make one dram.

8 drams or 480 minims make one ounce.

16 ounces one pint.

The minim is a measured drop. In dropping liquids from a bottle, there is a great difference in the size of the drop, according as the liquid is thick or thin, and the rim and neck of the bottle are large or small: whereas, when the drop is measured, the drop is always of the same size.

A Table spoonful is supposed to be, and is intended to be, half an ounce;

A Teaspoonful is supposed to be one dram;

A Wineglassful, an ounce and a half.

Considering the great variety in the sizes of both Tea and Tablespoons in the present day, it is evident that it would be to the advantage of every one using medicine to purchase what is called a "Minim Measure," and also a 2oz. graduated glass measure.

In the following tables the doses given are those proper for grown persons. Women and men over 60 may take rather less. For other ages the following will be the proportions:- If the dose for an adult is, say one dram - that of a person aged

From 14 to 18 will be 2/3 or 40 grains.

From 10 to 13 will be 1/2 or 30 grains.

From 7 to 9 will be 1/3 or 20 grains.

From 4 to 6 will be 1/4 or 15 grains.

3 years will be 1/6 or 10 grains.

2 years will be 1/8 or 8 grains.

1 year will be 1/12 or 5 grains.

And in the same proportions for other doses. It must be particularly remembered that children require smaller doses in proportion to their ages than grown persons, of Narcotics, Sedatives or Anodynes, and Antispasmodics, of anything in fact containing Opium, or any medicines of that description; and will bear larger doses of purgatives in proportion to their ages than grown persons.

The same rules must be observed in giving liquids. The dram is equal to 60 minims or drops, and may be counted as 60 grains.