The principal insects which are capable of inflicting painful or poisonous bites or stings are fleas, bed-bugs, bees, wasps, mosquitoes, the midge or buffalo fly, the jigger, ticks, spiders, the scorpion, and the centipede. Figs. 357 to 364.

Fig. 357. Centipede.

Fig. 357. Centipede.

Fig. 358. Scorpion.

Fig. 358. Scorpion.

Fig. 361. Tick. a, b, c. Jaws of the Insect.

Fig. 361. Tick. a, b, c. Jaws of the Insect.

Fig. 359. Jigger, a Female, natural size.

Fig. 359. Jigger, a Female, natural size.

Fig. 360. Bedbug.

Fig. 360. Bedbug.

Fig. 362. Flea.

Fig. 362. Flea.

Fig. 363. Lancet of Mosquito.

Fig. 363. Lancet of Mosquito.

Fig. 364. Tarantula.

Fig. 364. Tarantula.

The Treatment of Bites and Stings of Insects

The bites of such insects as the mosquito, flea, bedbug, and midge are generally relieved by bathing the parts with a weak solution of ammonia water, salt and water, or a solution of saleratus or baking soda. The same measures are useful for the relief of bee stings. When the sting is left in the wound, it should be carefully withdrawn. When a person is stung upon the inside of the month, a hot solution of salt and water should be used as a mouth-wash or gargle. Hot vinegar is useful for the same purpose. If the parts become very much swollen, so as to produce suffocation, they should be lanced and allowed to bleed freely. The bites of the spider and scorpion are to be treated upon the same principles. If abscesses or boils form, they should be lanced and treated as other boils.

The bite of the centipede is a much more serious matter, and should receive attention the moment it is inflicted, or as soon as possible, as death has sometimes occurred within a few hours. The part bitten should be incised with a sharp knife and encouraged to bleed freely by sucking or soaking in hot water. The treatment should be the same as recommended for bee stings and the bites of other insects, unless severe symptoms should develop, when the directions given for treatment of snake bites should be followed.