Deformities of the hands and feet, are both natural and acquired. In Figs. 408 to 418 are illustrated a number of different forms of deformity, some of which represent hands and feet with a superfluous or a deficient number of digits.

Figs. 408 to 418, Congenital Deformities of the Hands and Feet.

Figs. 408 to 418, Congenital Deformities of the Hands and Feet.

In cases in which there is a sixth toe or finger, Figs. 412, 414, and 415, the extra digit is generally imperfectly developed. In some cases in which the number of digits is normal, two or more are connected together, as in Figs. 409 and 410, reminding one of the webbed feet of the goose. Extra digits are generally in the way; when this is the case, they should be removed by a surgical operation.

Clubbed Hands

Clubbed Hands is a quite serious deformity, though fortunately rare. Much can be done to straighten the deformed organs by frequently manipulating them in such a way as to bring them into proper shape. In a majority of cases it is necessary to place the patient in the hands of a skillful surgeon.

Weak Ankles

This is a condition most often found in children. It may be the result of hereditary weakness, or of acquired disease, as infantile paralysis. Such cases require the employment of a properly made shoe, such as is illustrated in Fig. 439. The weak joint should be treated locally with electricity, the hot and cold pour, and daily rubbing.

Fig. 439. Shoe and Brace for Weak Ankle.

Fig. 439. Shoe and Brace for Weak Ankle.