Saliva

The fluid secreted by the salivary glands into the cavity of the mouth.

Saturnine

Preparations containing lead.

Sanguineous

Consisting of blood.

Sanies

A thin greenish discharge of fetid matter, from sores, fistulae, etc.

Scabies

Psora. Itch.

Scapula

The shoulder-blade.

Sciatica

A rheumatic affection of the hip-joint.

Scirrhus

Indolent, glandular tumor, generally preceding cancer in an ulcerated form.

Sclerotica

The hard membrane of the eye; it is situated immediately under the conjunctiva.

Scorbutus

Scurvy.

Secretory Vessels, or Organs

Parts of the animal economy, which separate or secrete the various fluids of the body.

Semi-Lateral

Limited to one side.

Sequela, plur

Sequela.

Sinus

A cavity or depression.

Slough

The part that separates from a foul ulcer.

Solidification

Vide Hepatization-

Somnolence

Disposition to sleep.

Sordes

The viscid, fetid, brownish, red-colored matter discharged from ulcers. The matter which forms round the teeth in fever, etc. has likewise received this appellation.

Specific

A remedy possessing a peculiai curative action in certain diseases.

Splenitis

Inflammation of the spleen.

Sputa

Expectoration of different kinds.

St. Anthony's Fire

Erysipelas.

Stertorous

Snoring.

Stomacace

Canker, or scurvy of the mouth.

Strabismus

Squinting.

Strangury

Painful discharge of urine.

Sternum

The breast-bone.

Stethoscope

An instrument to assist the ear in examining the morbid sounds of the chest.

Stricture

A constriction of a tube or duct of some part of the body.

Struma

Scrofula. The king's evil; adj. Strumous.

Stye

An inflammatory small tumor on the eyelid.

Sub-Maxillary

Under the jaw.

Sub-Maxillary Glands

Glands on the inner side of the lower jaw.

Sub-Mucous Tissue

Placed under the mucous membrane.

Suppuration

The morbid action by which pus is deposited, in inflammatory tumor, etc.

Subsultus Tendinum

Twitchings; sudden starts of the tendons; weak convulsive movements which are often too feeble to elevate the limb itself, but sufficiently strong to be readily seen or felt in the muscles and their tendons. They are most frequently met with in states of extreme debility, particularly in low, nervous, or typhoid fevers, and are, in such cases, usually to be dreaded as prognostications of approaching dissolution.

Syncope

Fainting or swooning.

Synochia

Continued inflammatory fever.