Cocillana. (Not official). - The bark of Sycocarpus Rusbyi (nat. ord. Mcliaceae).

Habitat

Bolivia.

Characters

The bark is thick, and ash-colored, becoming rough only with considerable age; inner surface is grayish-yellow; the odor is slight, but peculiar; taste unpleasant (not bitter), slightly nauseous.

Composition

Its chief constituents are - (1) Rusbyine (Eccles), an alkaloid. (2) Two Resins. (3) Tannic Acid. (4) Calcium Oxalate.

Preparations

1. Extractum Cocillanae Fluidum. - Fluid Extract of Cocillana. By maceration and percolation with Alcohol and Water, and evaporation.

Dose, 5 to 25 m.; .30 to 1.50 c.c.

2. Syrupus Cocillanae. - Syrup of Cocillafia. By maceration and percolation with Alcohol and Water, with addition of Sugar.

Dose, 1 to 2 fl. dr.; 4. to 8. c.c.

3. Tinctura Cocillanae. - Tincture of Cocillana. By maceration and percolation with Alcohol and Water, and addition of Alcohol.

Dose, 1 to 2 fl. dr.; 4. to 8. c.c.

Action And Uses Of Cocillana

Cocillana acts upon muciparous glands, increasing their activity; on the bronchial mucous membrane, causing expectoration; on the intestinal mucous membrane, producing a laxative effect; it also slightly increases the appetite; it slightly strengthens the heart beat, and the pulse, but does not stimulate the respiratory centre. The syrup does not act as a laxative, while the resins are distinctly purgative. It is of very great value as an expectorant, preferable to ipecacuanha, in that it does not so readily cause nausea and a metallic taste in the mouth, and assists the regular movement of the bowels. If, however, nausea should be produced, it is very persistent. Its action is fully established three to six hours after administration, and persists at least for six hours. It can, in many cases, be substituted for apomorphine, ammonium carbonate and for many other drugs, classed, with more or less reason, as expectorants.