When chloroform is applied to the skin and evaporation prevented, it causes heat, redness, and even vesication. Frequently, chloroform is used locally to produce this effect, but usually in combination with other counter-irritants. Rx Chloroformi, ol. terebinthinae, āā oz j; lin. saponis, oz ij. M. Sig.: Liniment. Rx Chloroformi, lin. camphorae, āā ozj. M. Sig.: Liniment. These are elegant counter-irritant applications, in cases requiring the milder remedies of this class, and are used in various internal inflammations and local affections characterized by pain. Commercial chloroform can be used in preparing them.

Chlorodyne

This empirical preparation is largely used in cholera, find in painful diseases requiring an anodyne. Numerous formulae have been published, but none of them appear to possess the exact qualities of the original preparation by Dr. J. C. Browne. The dose of the genuine chlorodyne ranges from ten to thirty drops. The following formula makes a product more nearly resembling the original than any other known to the author:

Chloroform.........................................    4 ounces.

Ether.............................................. 1 ounce.

Alcohol..............................................    4 ounces.

Treacle...............................................    4 ounces.

Extract of licorice.....................................    2½ ounces.

Muriate of morphine...................................    8 grains.

Oil of peppermint......................................  16 minims.

Sirup...................... ........................   17½ ounces.

Acid. hydrocyan. dil................................ ...    2 ounces.

Dissolve the muriate of morphine and the oil of peppermint in the alcohol, mix the chloroform and ether with this solution, dissolve the extract of licorice in the sirup, and add the treacle; shake these two solutions together, and add the hydrocyanic acid. Dose, five to fifteen minims.

Some of the published formulae contain resin of cannabis Indica, atropine, perchloric acid, in addition to the ingredients above given.

Another chlorodyne, known as "Gilman's," has many advantages, and is now widely used. Its composition is as follows: Rx Chloroformi purificati, 3 ij; glycerini, oz ij; spts. vini rect., oz ij; acid, hydrocanic. dil., 3 ij; tinct. capsici, 3 ij; morphinae muriatis, gr. viij; syrupi (treacle), oz iij. M. The dose of this chlorodyne for an adult is a tea spoon-ful. In prescribing the various mixtures known by the common name— chlorodyne—the strength should be ascertained before administering.

The following formulae (Fox) are very efficacious in the local affections for which they are recommended :

Rx Chloroformi, τη vj; cucumber cerate, oz j. M. Sig.: Ointment for pruritus. Rx Plumbi carbonat., 3 ss; chloroformi, τη iv; ung. aquae rosae, oz j. M. Sig.: Ointment for pruritus. Rx Chloroformi, τη viij; glycerin., 3 j; ung. simplicis, 3 vj; potassii cyanidi, grs. iv. M. Sig.: Ointment for pruritus. Rx Morphinae acetat., 1 part; chloroform, 8 parts; lard, 60 parts; oil of sweet almonds, 40 parts. M. An ointment to be applied several times a day in pruritus pudendi.

Authorities referred to:

Bartholow, Dr. Roberts. On the Deep Injection of Chloroform for the Relief of Tic-Douloureux. The Practitioner, July, 1874, p. 9.

Fournier, Dr. H. Annuaire de Thérapeutique, 1879, pp. 68-70.

FÉrÉol, Dr. Injection Sous-cutanées de Chloroforme. Annuaire de Thérapeutique, 1879, p. 68.

Gubler, Dr. Adolph. Commentaires Thérapeutique du Codex Medicamentarius, p. 670.

Husemann, Dr. Theodor. Handbuch der gesammten Arzneimittellehre, zweiter Band, 1869.

Trousseau et Pidoux. Traité de Thérapeutique et Mature Médicale, eighth edition.