The root of an Asiatic and European plant, is a gentle purgative, with also some tonic property, which makes it especially adapted to dyspeptic persons, and others disposed to constipation. Dose, for such a use, from three to six or eight grains. Many people buy the root in pieces, as it comes in the shops, and cut off daily what, on trial, they find to suffice for them. Less trouble attends the use of simple rhubarb pills; one or more as may be necessary ; if only one, bedtime will be the best time to take it; if two, one at night and one in the morning.

RHUBARB (RHEUM PALMATUM).

RHUBARB (RHEUM PALMATUM).

Compound rhubarb pills contain also scammony and aloes (both strong cathartics), as well as myrrh. They are at least twice as active as simple rhubarb pills.

Simple syrup of rhubarb is a very good opening medicine for infants. Dose, for a babe, about a teaspoonful.

Spiced syrup of rhubarb is one of the often est useful of all domestic medicines. It contains, besides rhubarb, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, alcohol, sugar and water. It is therefore aromatic and gently stimulant, as well as promotive of action of the bowels. This last effect, that of a purgative, is so slight, that it is generally useful in correcting irregular intestinal secretion, and thus curing diarrhaea, if given at an early stage. It is also very relieving to colicky pain with diarrhoea ; and is an excellent "vehicle" with which to mix other medicines of nasty taste, as castor-oil; or those which do not readily dissolve in pure water.

The dose of spiced syrup of rhubarb is from a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful; not as a purgative, for which effect the simple syrup of rhubarb is better; but to correct and relieve diarrhoea, especially when accompanied with pain, at an early stage.

Rochelle Salts : Tartrate of sodium ana potassium. A not very disagreeable, moderately active, purgative medicine; one of the most convenient and suitable at the beginning of an inflammatory or febrile illness ; such as bronchitis, pneumonia, measles, scarlet fever, remittent fever, etc. Dose, from a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful, dissolved in a fourth or a third part of a tumblerful of water.