Dochme

A measure among the Greeks of four fingers' breadth.

Docimastica

See Cupella.

Docimastice

The docimastic art: the art of analysing fossils.

Dock

A common plant, of which different kinds are used in medicine, particularly the water dock, Hy-drolapathum, q. v. The wood sorrel is sometimes called the sour dock. The docks are, in their botanical analog}', nearly allied to the rhubarb.

Doctiletus

Paracelsus mentions it as a medicine for cancer; but he does not explain what it is.

Doctor

(From doceo, to teach). The highest step in medical rank: formerly confined to men who were appointed by authority to direct the application of medicines for the prevention and cure of diseases. At this time the term is most shamefully prostituted; for, so far from being confined to men who have had the honour conferred upon them from merit, and a proper education, it is as liberally bestowed upon the most ignorant pretenders.

Dod

An abbreviation of Remberti Dodonaei Stir-pium Historiae Pemptades sex.

Dodecadactylon

(From Dodecadactylon 3019 twelve, and .finger's length). Sec Duodenum.

Dodecandria

(From Dodecandria 3021 twelve, and husband). The eleventh of Linnaeus's classes of plants. It comprehends those plants which produce hermaphrodite flowers, and have from twelve to nineteen stamina. The five orders are taken from the number of the pistils.

Dodecapharmacum

(From Dodecapharmacum 3023 twelve, and a medicine). See Apostolorum unguentum.

Docecatheon

(From Docecatheon 3025 and pono).

The name of an antidote which consists of twelve simples, described by P. .AEgineta; and of the sanicula.

Dodra

A potion among the ancients, consisting of nine ingredients.

Dodrans

(see Cyathus,) the name also of a measure of nine inches, and a weight of ten ounces.

Doedyx

(From Doedyx 3027 a pestle and mortar.) See Cochlearia.

Dogga

An Arabic term for the paronychia.

Dog And Duck Waters

This spring is situated in Surrey, about half a mile from Westminster bridge. Its solid contents appear different at different times. Dr. Hales obtained from one gallon 324 grains; Dr. Fothergill, 200; Dr. Rutty, only 96. Of this about 1/12th part is an earth, which, Dr. Rutty says, is soluble in acids, but does not calcine to lime: the salt is vi-triolated magnesia and sea salt mixed together. Drunk from one to three pints, it generally purges briskly. Sec Aquae catharticae: amarae.

Dogma

(From Dogma 3028 to be of opinion). It is a principle, tenet, or settled opinion, with regard to matters of faith or philosophy: in medicine, a sentiment founded on established principles, whatever may have been their basis. Hence,