The enameled iron sink is a great advancement in sanitary improvements. When made properly and used for light work it is all that could be desired, because it is coated with a material which wears well, and is also proof against the action of gases or acids. It has a smooth finish and is easily kept clean, but it is not suitable for heavy or rough work. In the larger sinks this enameled coating cracks off easily when heavy utensils are placed in it, which causes the sink to bend, and the enamel, having very little elasticity, must naturally crack. It sometimes cracks by the uneven or sudden expansion and contraction of the iron, and as soon as the coating is partly cracked off the sink becomes sanitarily bad.

Sinks 202

Fig. 152.

Sinks 203

Fig. 153.

A roll rim enameled iron sink is shown in Fig. 156. It has a high back, concealed air chambers and nickel-plated faucets. A corner enameled iron sink with roll rim, high back, concealed air chambers and nickel-plated faucets is shown in Fig. 157. Instead of having brackets for support, it is carried by the walls and one leg. A plain enameled iron sink is shown in Fig. 158.

Sinks 204

Fig. 154.

Sinks 205

Fig. 155.

A roll rim drawn steel sink with high back is illustrated in Fig. 159.