A plain bibb compression faucet for lead pipe, with flange and thimble is shown in Fig. 187, and a hose-bibb compression faucet with flange and thimble in Fig. 188.

A plaih-bibb compression faucet with shoulder for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 189, and a hosebibb compression faucet with shoulder for iron pipe in Fig. 190.

Faucets 219

Fig. 169.

Fig. 191 shows a plain bibb compression faucet with flange and inside thread for iron pipe and Fig. 192 a hose-bibb compression faucet with flange and inside thread for iron pipe.

A plain bibb L-handle ground faucet with

Faucets 220

Fig. 170.

Faucets 221

Pig. 171.

Faucets 222

Fig. 172.

Faucets 223

Fig. 173.

Faucets 224

Fig. 174.

Faucets 225

Fig. 175.

Faucets 226

Fig. 176.

Faucets 227

Fig. 177.

Faucets 228

Fig. 178.

Faucets 229

Fig. 179.

Faucets 230

Pig. 180.

Faucets 231

Fig. 181.

Faucets 232

Fig. 182.

Faucets 233

Fig. 183.

Faucets 234

Fig. 184.

Faucets 235

Fig. 185.

Faucets 236

Fig. 186.

Faucets 237

Fig. 187.

Faucets 238

Fig. 188.

Faucets 239

Fig. 189.

Faucets 240

Fig. 190.

shoulder for iron pipe is illustrated in Fig. 193, and a hose-bibb L-handle ground faucet with shoulder for iron pipe in Fig. 194.

Faucets 241

Fig. 191.

Faucets 242

Fig. 192.

Faucets 243

Fig. 193.

A plain bibb L-handle ground faucet for lead pipe is shown in Fig. 195, and a hose-bibb L-handle ground faucet for lead pipe in Fig. 196.

Faucets 244

Fig. 194.

Faucets 245

Fig. 195.

Faucets 246

Fig. 196,

Self-closing Faucet. Self-closing faucets are fitted with either a torsion or a compression form of spring, which always holds the valve on its seat, except when in use, and then it must be held up by the hand which acts against the spring through a T or L-handled lever, and when released the spring by its own pressure closes the valve against the flow of the water. The advantages of a self-closing faucet are to prevent the overflowing of washbowls, bathtubs, sinks and other fixtures. The water cannot be left running when the self-closing style is used, as when they are released by the hand, the pressure of the spring immediately closes the valve and shuts off the water. One style of self-closing bibb cock is shown in Fig. 197. The details of construction are very clearly shown in the drawing. The valve has a square thread of very quick pitch upon its stem, which is surrounded by a torsion spring, one end of which is attached to the head of the valve and the other to the under side of the threaded cap or cover of the faucet. Upon turning the valve by means of the T-handle on its outer and upper end the valve is raised from its seat by the action of the screw. At the same time the spring is compressed, upon releasing the handle the spring brings the valve back upon its seat.

Bibb and Stop-Cocks. A Fuller plain bibb cock with shoulder for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 198, and a Fuller hose-bibb cock with shoulder for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 199.

Faucets 247

Fig. 197.

Fig. 200 illustrates a Fuller plain bibb cock with flange and iron pipe thread, and Fig. 201 a Fuller hose-bibb with flange and iron pipe thread.

A Fuller plain bibb cock with flange and inside thread for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 202, and a Fuller hose-bibb with flange and inside thread for iron pipe in Fig. 203.

Faucets 248

Fig. 198.

Faucets 249

Fig. 199.

Faucets 250

Fig. 200.

Faucets 251

Fig. 201.

Faucets 252

Fig. 202.

Faucets 253

Fig. 203.

Different styles of Fuller basin cocks are shown in Figs.' 204, 205, 206 and 207. Self-clos-

Faucets 254

Fig. 204.

Faucets 255

Fig. 205.

Faucets 256

Fig. 206.

Faucets 257

Fig. 207.

ing basin cocks are shown in Figs. 208 and 209, the one shown in Fig. 208 is to be connected to the slab and the one in Fig. 209 to the back of the wash basin. An L-handle stop-cock for lead pipe is shown in Fig. 210, and an L-handle stop-cock for lead pipe with check and waste in Fig. 211.

Faucets 258

Fig. 208.

Faucets 259

Fig. 209.

A T-handle straight-way stop-cock for lead pipe is shown in Fig. 212, and also an L-handle straight-way stop-cock for lead pipe with check and waste in Fig. 213.

Faucets 260

Fig. 210.

Faucets 261

Fig. 211.

Faucets 262

Fig. 212.

A T-handle round-way stop-cock for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 214, and also a T-handle round-way stop-cock with check and waste.

Faucets 263

Fig. 213.

Faucets 264Faucets 265

Fig. 214.

An L-handle straight-way stop-cock for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 215, and also an L-handle straight-way cock with check and waste for iron pipe.

An L-handle round-way stop-cock for iron pipe is illustrated in Fig. 216, and also an L-handle round-way stop-cock with check and waste.

A semi-finished T-handle stop-cock for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 217, also a semi-finished

Faucets 266

Fig. 215.

Faucets 267

Fig. 216.

Faucets 268

Fig. 217.

T-handle stop-cock for iron pipe with check and waste.

A semi-finished L-handle stop-cock for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 218, and a semi-finished L-handled stop-cock with check and waste in Fig. 219.

Faucets 269

Fig. 218.

Faucets 270

Fig. 219.

A T-handle straight-way stop-cock for iron pipe is shown in Fig. 220; also a T-handle straight-way stop-cock with check and waste.

Boiler and Water-back Fittings. The best pipe to use for boiler and water-back connections is brass, with fittings of the same material having threaded joints. A soldered joint should not be used in these connections, and where unions are to be used they should be ground-joint unions, that is, without packing. Lead pipe is too soft for this purpose; and further will not stand the high temperature which the water in these connections sometimes attains. Wrought-iron pipe will either rust solidly, or be honey-combed and cut to pieces by the action of the water in a very little while.

Faucets 271

Fig. 220.

Boiler fittings are shown in Figs. 221 and 222, and water-back connections in Figs. 223 and 224.