Poon-Wood

POON-WOOD, or Peon-wood, of Singapore, is of a light porous texture, and light greyish cedar colour; it is used in ship-building for planks, and makes excellent spars. The Calcutta poon is preferred.

Calophyllum inophyllum is called Poona in the peninsula of India, and C. angustifo-lium, Dr. Roxburgh says, is a native of Penang and of countries eastward of the Bay of Bengal, and that it yields the straight spars commonly called Poon, and which in those countries are used for the masts of ships.

Princes-Wood

PRINCES-WOOD, from Jamaica, is generally sent in logs like cocoa-wood, from 4 to 7 in. diameter, and 4 to 5 ft. long; it is a light veined wood something like West India satin-wood, but of a browner cast; the sap-wood resembles dark birch-wood. It is principally used for turning.

The Princes-wood of Jamaica, called also Spanish elm, is Cordia Gercucanthus, but the above appears to be different.

Prize-Wood

PRIZE-WOOD. A large ill-defined wood, from the Brazils, apparently of the cocus-wood kind, but lighter, and generally of reddish colour.

Purple-Heart

PURPLE-HEART is mentioned by Dr. Bancroft, (see Greenheart.) it is perhaps the more proper name for the wood next described.

Purple Wood

PURPLE WOOD, or Amaranthus, from the Brazils, is imported in logs from 8 to 12 in. square and 8 to 10 ft long, or in planks: its colour is dark gray when first out, but it changes rapidly, and ultimately becomes a dark purple.

Varieties of King-wood are sometimes called purple and violet woods: these are variegated; but the true purple-wood is plain, and principally used for ramrods, and occasionally for buhl-work, marquetry, and turning. A few logs of purple-wood are often found in importations of King-wood; it is probable also that the purple-heart is thus named occasionally.

Quassia Wood

QUASSIA WOOD). The quassia-tree is beautiful tall tree, of North and South

America and the West Indies. The wood is of a pale yellow, or light-brown, and about as hard as beech; its taste is intensely bitter, but the smell in very agreeable; the wood, bark, and fruit ore all medicinal.

"This wood is well known in the Isthmus of Darien, and is invariably carried by all the natives as a 'contra' against the bite of venomous snakes: it is chewed in small slices, and the juice is swallowed." - Col. G. A. Lloyd.

Quassia amara is a small tree, Simarubs amara is the Mountain dameson of the West Indies sod Picraena excelsa, the lofty Bitter-wood. All have a simillary-coloured wood, which is intensely bitter.

Queen-Wood

QUEEN-WOOD, from the Brazils, a term applied occasionally to woods of the Greenheart and Cocoa-wood character.

Quince-Tree

QUINCE-TREE, (Cydonia vulgaris.) See Apricot-tree.

Red Gum-Wood

RED GUM-WOOD. See Gum-wood.

Red Saunders

RED SAUNDERS, or RUBY WOOD, an East Indian wood, the produce of Pterocarpus santalinus, is principally shipped from Calcutta in logs from 2 to 10 in. diameter, generally without sap, and sometimes in roots and split pieces; it is very hard and heavy; it is very much used as a red dye-wood, and often for turning. The logs are often notched at both ends, or cut with a hole as for a rope, and much worn externally from being dragged along the ground; other woods, and also the ivory tusks, are sometimes perforated for the like purpose.

The wood of Adenanhera paconia, (see Coral-wood,) is similar in nature, and sometimes confounded with the red saunders.

Rosetta-Wood

ROSETTA-WOOD is a good-sized East Indian wood, imported in logs 9 to 14 in. diameter; it is handsomely veined; the general colour is a lively red-orange, (like the skin of the Malta orange,) with darker marks, which are sometimes nearly black; the wood is close, hard, and very beautiful when first cut, but soon gets darker.