While we still spend hours on end "talking to" people, yet research reveals that 7/8 of the "materials" of our mental life enter via the eye. In planning to advance Rural Scouting, why should we not use the best ways available-visual methods? Leaders of Area Councils (both volunteer and employed), District organizations, members of District Operating or Planning Committees, Commissioner Staff-members and individual Scouters-any and all of these have uses for charts to tell their story and to reach brain and heart of their audiences.

Making Charts

Charts are not hard to make. Almost any group of Scouts or Scouters boasts of someone who is skillful with pen, pencil, crayon or brush in "quick" lettering.

In addition, there are commercial artists who do lettering. In many stores, there is some one who can make good clear signs-and attractive charts. In most city schools there is an "art teacher." Many rural school teachers have had some art training. In most school groups there is someone who can train Scouts in simple art work.

THE SIZE OF THE CHART is determined in part by the size of the group who may see it. It must be big enough to be read, or it is not useful. Use large letters and few words. Keep chart simple-short terse phrases-not too many ideas on a chart. With two or more ideas, they may be numbered 1-2-3-4, in order of importance. Colors should be contrasty-a light cardboard with dark color, a dark colored cardboard with white paint.

Where charts are for exhibit purposes and the reader can be within a few feet of the chart, the chart and its letters do not need to be made as large as when designed for larger audiences. Photographs pasted on cardboard with proper legends make valuable exhibits. For use in personal Conferences these charts may be made letterhead size and put in a loose leaf cover so but one is shown at a time.

The following sample chart material has been used effectively by the Rural Scouting Service in training courses, conferences and at public meetings of all kinds.

SCOUTING HELPS HOME

Character Training

Trains in Unselfishness

Helpful in Homework

Life-Work Training

Trains in Health

Hobby Lines

Trains in Safety

Use of Spare Time

Trains in Virtues

Reverence

Trains in Respect for

Tolerance

Parents

Cooperation

SCOUTING HELPS SCHOOL

Leadership and Morale

Good Turns

Health Work

Relates School to Home

Safety Training

Relates School to Free-

First Aid Work

time

Citizenship Training

Supplements School Edu-

Motivation

cation

SCOUTING HELPS CHURCHES

Holds Boy-life to Church

Relates Church to Com-

Trains in Character

munity

Teaches Reverence

Helps Church in Recrea-

Relates Boys to Men of

tion

Church

Helps Church in Social

Relates Church to Boys'

Life

Homes

Trains for Church Leader-

Builds into Church

ship

TO SUCCEED, WE MUST KNOW RURAL-

Field

Leaders-Best Men

People

Boy Needs

Groups

Neighborhood Needs

Organizations

Plans and Programs

PLANS-METHODS-

-PROGRAMS-MUST BE:

Adaptable

Helpful in Rural Urban

Acceptable

Understanding

Workable

Helpful to Local Institu-

Result Getting

tions

Understood by Rural

Helpful to Parents in

Leaders

Home and Farm

PLANS USED

Troop

Neighborhood Patrol

Tribe

Senior Scouting

Lone Scouting

Scouters

"ALL-COVERAGE" IN SCOUTING MEANS-CUBBING AGE-9, 10 and 11 SCOUT AGE-12, 13, 14 and 15 SENIOR SCOUT AGE-16 to 21

THIS MEANS-SERVICE TO RURAL TOWNS AND VILLAGES AND OPEN COUNTRY