In planning camping for rural boys, Councils and District organizations and Committees must recognize the need for dealing with:

1. Rural Troops, with their farm boy membership, as well as boys of town and village.

2. Neighborhood Patrols.

3. Lone Scout Tribes.

4. Lone Scouts.

In addition there are Senior Scouts in Rural Explorer Patrols, Sea Scout Patrols and Sea Scout Ships and Rover Crews as well as Lone Explorers and Lone Rovers. For all of these, the training in Scout Camping is to be made available as part of Scouting's contribution to their development.

For each of these different forms in which Scouting is brought to rural boys, let us outline a practical and natural way in which camping may be made easily accessible to them. In doing so, camping is being interpreted as something more than a summer camp- or just as a possible activity for any and all seasons of the year when it can fit into the rural farm and crop calendars.

The first of these rural Scout groups to be served are the Rural Troops, where membership comes from both town and farms.

Dr. West in speaking of the valuable training which

Troop and Tribe Camping affords and its central emphasis in Scouting said:

"If we are to justify Scouting as an outdoor movement we must further promote camping as an organized Scout group activity. A young man, looking back on his experience as a Scout, should have had the opportunity to get out with nature-into the open-the woods, where he was able to make his own camp, to do his own job and to stand on his own feet."

His plans involve the training of every Scout in camping, both rural and urban.

The National Service of Camping and Activities has developed a set of "Standards for Camping" which should be secured from the Local Council and made the basis of study and discussion by every Scout group, urban and rural, and its Committee so that Scoutmaster and Committee may plan for their Camping Program.

The Local Council also has the standards of Health and Safety for camps, which the District Camping Committee should fit definitely into all camping plans for the boys of the District.

1. Camping For Rural Scout Groups

The Rural Scout group has the right and privilege of turning to the council and district for help and advice in developing the Camping Program. The council site or sites for various kinds of camps are made available with such facilities as the council has developed.

Most councils have a "Declaration of Purpose" blank on which the individual rural Scout group can outline its own camping plans fitted to its own crop seasons, its home conditions, its school schedules, its church, grange, 4-H Club and other activities, fitted also to the camping experience and wishes of its own Scouts.

New York Scouts Make Camp

NEW YORK SCOUTS MAKE CAMP.

In making this plan the rural committee which sponsors the Scout group and rural Scoutmaster should advise with the District Commissioners and the Chairman of the District Camping Committee.

This blank contains the following items:

Declaration Of Purpose Our Troop Camping Objectives

This is to certify that the officers and members of Scout group,............Troop,..........Tribe,.............

N. Patrol,............... Local Council, Boy Scouts of

America, have adopted as their purpose for the current year, the following camping objectives, and "on our honor will do our best" to merit a place on the Council Honor Roll of Outdoor Scouts.

1. Plan and conduct at least one outdoor Scouting session each month.

2. Attend camp as an organized group unit for at least one week whether at the Council Camp or approved independent camp.

3. Plan Troop or Group Program so that each Scout may have at least 10 whole days and nights camping experience during the year, including summer camp, camporees, overnight hikes and short-term camps.

4. Study and live up to the Scout Camping Minimum Standards in all outdoor Scout activities.

5. "Be Prepared" to help in any public service or emergency in which our camping ability may qualify us to be helpful to others.

6. Prepare a "Camp Log" of our outdoor Trips as a Scout group, record what will be helpful to other Scouts who may follow along this trail.

Signed, this........day of....................., 19....

Scoutmaster .........................................

Chairman of Troop Committee.........................

ASM .....................ASM .....................

Senior Patrol Leader.................................

P. L.....................for....................Patrol

P. L.....................for....................Patrol

P. L.....................for....................Patrol

P. L.....................for....................Patrol

Where the rural Scouts constitute a separate Patrol of a town Troop, it is recommended that the Rural Patrol or Patrols be encouraged to develop their own Patrol camping plan under the advice of their Scoutmaster. If possible in terms of home conditions, crop and chore demands, and their school and other schedules, this Patrol program should go along in step with all Scout plans and projects. If, however, these home and seasonal demands make that impossible, or even a problem, the Scoutmaster should aid the Rural Patrols in building alternative events and projects so that these rural Scouts shall not be denied the training which can come to all Scouts through Scout-planned camping.

Our Scout Camping Calendar

Month

Scheduled Activities

Completed Activities

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

One copy of the Declaration of Purpose to be submitted to Local Council Office now: The other copy to be kept on Bulletin Board and completed activities noted each month. At the close of the twelve months' period it is to be forwarded to the Local Council Office for certification by Council Officers, toward entry on the Council Honor Roll of camping groups.

Where there are but a few rural Scouts scattered in the sections served by organized groups, the Scoutmaster and sponsoring committee face the same obligation to sit down and plan with these individual Scouts and their parents the fullest camping program which the Scouts' life and home situation permit. This makes it possible to be fair with each boy in terms of his own need and own opportunity.