Distress for Rent.

At common law the landlord has a remedy, called "distress." 114 for enforcing the payment of rent, by seizing personal property

Mon. (Ky.) 619; Elliott v. Smith, 23 Pa. St. 131; Morley v. Rodgers, 5 Yerg. (Tenn.) 217; Anderson v. Anderson, 104 Ala. 428, 16 South. 14. And see Barlow v. Dahm, 97 Ala. 414, 12 South. 293.

112 Doe v. Reynolds, 27 Ala. 364, 376; Russell v. Fabyan, 34 N. H. 223; Ragor v. Mckay, 44 111. App. 79. But see Nash v. Springstead, 72 Hun, 474, 25 N. Y. Supp. 279.

113 Morse v. Goddard, 13 Mete. (Mass.) 177: Simers v. Saltus, 3 Denlo (N. Y.) 217. And see Delaney v. Fox, 2 C. B. (N. S.) 775.

114 The other remedies of the lessor can only be enumerated. For rent, they are: Debt, Bordman v. Osborn, 23 Pick. (Mass.) 295; Allen v. Bryan, 5 Barn. & C. 512; assumpsit, Smith v. Stewart, 6 Johns. (N. Y.) 46; Chambers v. Ross, 25 N. J. Law, 293; Brolasky v. Ferguson, 48 Pa. St. 434; covenant. Gale v. Nixon, 6 Oow. (N. Y.) 445; Saltoun v. Houstoun, 1 Bing. 433; or bill in equity, Lawrence v. Hammett, 3 J. J. Marsh. (Ky.) 287; Livingston's Ex'rs v. Livingston, 4 Johns. Ch. (N. Y.) 287; North v. Strafford. 3 P. Wms. 148. For waste, are actions to prevent, Watson v. Hunter, 5 Johns. Ch. (N. Y.) 169; and for damages, Harder v. Harder, 26 Barb. (N. Y.) 409; Queen's College v. Hallett, 14 East, 489; Artersoll v. Stevens, 1 Taunt 196. To recover possession, are ejectment, Jackson v. Brownson, 7 Johns. (N. Y.) 227; Penn v. Divellin, 2 Yeates (Pa.) 309; Cobb v. Lavalle, 89 111. 331; Colston v. Mcvay,

1 A. K. Marsh. (Ky.) 251; and summary proceeding given by statute in most states, Fratcher v. Smith (Mich.) 62 N. W. 832; Lewis v. Sheldon, 103 Mich. 102, 61 N. W. 269; Marsters v. Cling, 163 Mass. 477, 40 N. E. 763. The lessee's actions are: Replevin, for wrongful distress, Hunter v. Le Conte, 6 Cow. i N. Y.) 728; trespass, for interference with his possession, Taylor v. Cooper (Mich.) 62 N. W. 157; Hey v. Moorhouse, 8 Scott, 156; Van Brunt v. Scbenck, 11 Johns. (N. Y.) 385; Lunt v. Brown, 13 Me. 236; case, for excessive distress, Hare v. Stegall, 60 111. 380 (and see Fishburne v. Engledove, 91 Va. 548, 22 S. E. 354); and covenant, 2 Taylor, Landl. & Ten. (8th Ed.) 260. For the action of forcible entry and detainer, see 2 Tayl. Landl. & Ten. (8th Ed.) 396;

2 Wood. Landl. & Ten. (2d Ed.) 1374; Willard v. Warren, 17 Wend. (N. Y.) 257; Toby v. Schultz, 51 111. App. 487; and post, p. 165.

Real Prop.-10 found on the demised premises.115 This remedy exists in some of our states,116 while in many others it is incorporated into the law of attachments and liens.117 It lies for all rents reserved which are certain.118 The distraint may be made by the lessor, or the assignee of the reversion, for all the rent due.119 It is now required, in most states, that the warrant be executed by a legal officer.120 At common law, any chattels121 found upon the premises could be distrained, whether belonging to the tenant, or to others,122 though exception was made in favor of goods brought there in course of trade.123 The tendency of modern decisions and statutes is to restrict the right of distraining to the property of the lessee.124 There is a right to sell the goods taken, if they are not redeemed within the time fixed by the statutes.125

115 2 Tayl. Landl. & Ten. (8th Ed.) 168; 2 Wood, Landl. & Ten. (2d Ed.) 1305; Newman v. Anderton, 2 Bos. & P. (N. R.) 224. Cf. Beeszard v. Capel, 8 Barn. & C. 141; Prescott v. Boucher, 3 Barn. & Adol. 849.

116 2 Tayl. Landl. & Ten. (Stb Ed.) 170.

117 See 1 Stim. Am. St. Law, §§ 2031-2036. And see Willard v. Rogers, 54 111. App. 5S3; Rogers v. Grigg (Tex. Civ. App.) 29 S. W. 654; Belser v. Youngblood, 103 Ala. 545, 15 South. 863; Manhattan Trust Co. v. Sioux City & N. Ry. Co., 68 Fed. 72; Smith v. Dayton (Iowa) 62 N. W. 650; Toney v. Goodley. 57 Mo. App. 235; Ballard v. Johnson, 114 N. C. 141, 19 S. E. 98.

118 Stewart v. Gregg, 42 S. C. 392, 20 S. E. 193. Cf. Tutter v. Fryer, Winch, 7; Paxton v. Kennedy, 70 Miss. 865, 12 South. 546.

119 Slocum v. Clark, 2 Hill (N. Y.) 475; Lathrop v. Clewis, 63 Ga. 282. But not by executor for rent accruing In decedent's lifetime. Prescott v. Boucher. 3 Barn. & Adol. 849. Cf. - v. Cooper, 2 Wils. 375; Parmenter v. Webber, 8 Taunt. 593.

120 For the details and procedure the student must consult the statutes of his state.

121 Unless of a perishable nature. Morley v. Pincombe, 2 Exch. 101. And see Van Sickler v. Jacobs, 14 Johns. (N. Y.) 434.

122 2 Wood, Landl. & Ten. (2d Ed.) 1310; Blanche v. Bradford, 38 Pa. St. 344; Spencer v. Mcgowen, 13 Wend. (N. Y.) 256. And see Paine v. Lock Co., 64 Miss. 175, 1 South. 56; Davis v. Payne's Adm'r, 4 Rand. (Va.) 332.

123 Brown v. Stackhouse, 155 Pa. St. 582, 26 Atl. 669; Cadwalader v. Tin-dall, 20 Pa. St. 422; Knowles v. Pierce, 5 Houst. (Del.) 178; Block v. Latham, 63 Tex. 414.

124 2 Tayl. Landl. & Ten. (8th Ed.) 197; Connah v. Hale, 23 Wend. (N. Y.) 475; Peacock v. Purvis, 2 Brod. & B. 362.

125 2 Wood, Landl. & Ten. (2d Ed.) 1322; 2 Tayl. Landl. & Ten. (8th Ed.) 214. The right to sell was first given by the statute of 2 W. & M. c. 5.

Same - transfer Of Estates For Years

83. After an estate for years has been created, the inter-erests of the parties are transferable. The transfer may be:

(a) By act of parties, as where:

(1) The lessor assigns the rent or the reversion, or both (p. 147).

(2) The lessee (p. 148)

(I) Assigns his term, in which case the assignee is liable on all covenants running with the land.

(II) Sublets his term, in which case the sublessee is liable only to the sublessor.

(b) By operation of law, as where (p. 149):

(1) The interest of either party is taken on execution.

(2) On the lessor's death, his interest goes to his heirs or devisees.

(3) On the lessee's death, his interest goes to his personal representative.