Saida (Anc. Sidon Or Zidon), a town of Syria, in the pashalic of Acre, 24 m. S. S. W. of Beyrout, on the ST. W. slope of a promontory projecting into the Mediterranean; lat. 33° 34' N., lon. 35° 23' E.; pop. about 6,000, principally Moslems and Greeks. It has several great khans or caravansaries. The harbor was tilled up by the emir Fakhr ed-Din in the 17th century, and is now only accessible for boats. A ruinous old castle, supposed to have been built about the beginning of the Christian era, occupies a large artificial rock or mole at the mouth of the harbor, and is connected with the city by a bridge of nine arches. The chief trade of the town is in silk. The environs are famous for their fruit. The ruins of ancient Sidon are about 2 m. inland. On Jan. 20, 1855, a sarcophagus, now in the Louvre, was discovered among these ruins, with a Phoenician inscription 22 lines in length, indicating that it had been the resting place of Eshmunazar, king of the Sidonians, of uncertain date. About the same time several pots of gold coin, of the age of Alexander the Great, were disentombed here; the whole amount was of the value of about $40,000. The ancient necropolis was excavated in 1860 by the French expedition under M. Renan. - Saida was bombarded and taken by the allied Turkish, Austrian, and English fleets in 1840. (See Sidon).

Saida.

Saida.