Bushire, Or Abu-Shehr, a seaport town of Persia, in the province of Fars, on the N. E. coast of the Persian gulf, at the northern extremity of a peninsula, to the north and east of which is the bay. The climate is extremely hot and unhealthy, producing various kinds of disease, especially of the eyes. In 1831 the plague made a fearful havoc among the population, which from 20,000 in previous years dwindled down to 5,000 or 6,000 in 1858; but the number has since somewhat increased. Besides many huts of palm wood outside of the gates, there are about 400 white stone houses in the town, which present an agreeable appearance from a distance; and the badgirs, or ventilators, raised over the houses to the height of 100 feet, contribute to enhance this impression. The narrow streets, which are very numerous, are in a miserable condition. There are few handsome buildings in the town excepting the East India company's factory and the sheikh's palace. - Bushire is the great emporium of Persia. Its merchants carry on an extensive trade with India, Russia, and Turkey, and supply almost all Persia with goods. The principal imports from India are steel, indigo, sugars, and spices.

Manufactured goods are imported from England and continental Europe, a British consular resident having long been maintained at Bushire. Many goods sent from Europe to India are thence exported to Bushire. The exports are raw silk, sheep's and goats' wool, horses, dried fruit, wine, grain, copper, turquoises, tobacco, yellow dye berries, asafoetida and various sorts of drugs, rose water, gall nuts, pearls, and other minor articles. The principal exports of manufactured articles are carpets, shawls, velvets, silk goods, and gold and silver brocades. Cot-t>n is extensively produced, and chiefly retained for home consumption, although some of it is exported to Russia and other countries. The great route to the interior of Persia starts at Bushire, and is of great commercial and strategical importance. On the land side the town is fortified by a mud wall with round towers. In the war between England and Persia, Bushire became the basis of military operations, and was captured Dec. 9, 1856, at the very outset of the expedition.

Bushire.

Bushire.