Hereford , a city and parliamentary and municipal borough of England, capital of Herefordshire, on the N. bank of the Wye, here crossed by a bridge of six arches, 136 m. by railway W. N. W. of London; pop. in 1871, 18,335. The principal building is the cathedral, refounded in 1079, of early Norman architecture, cruciform, with a frontage of 325 ft. and a breadth of 110 ft. The west front fell in 1780, and was rebuilt in an incongruous style, but the rest of the building has recently been restored in the best manner. It has many fine monuments, some as old as the 11th century, a chapter house, Lady chapel, cloisters, and a library containing valuable manuscripts, among them Wycliffe's Bible. Hereford is noted for its ancient charities, among which are 11 hospitals, or almshouses, which distribute money and bread. The manufactures are not important; they consist of gloves, once the staple industry, hats, flannels, leather, and cutlery. Iron works have been established since the opening of the railway to the coal district. Six fairs are held annually, the October fair being the largest in England for cattle and cheese.

A musical festival is given triennial-ly, in the cathedral, by the united choirs of Hereford, Worcester, and Gloucester. Hereford retains several of its ancient privileges.

Hereford Cathedral.

Hereford Cathedral.