Inkberry, the popular name of ilex glabra, a shrub now placed in the same genus with the holly, but formerly known as prinos glaber. It is slender and rather graceful, usually 2 to 4 ft. high, but sometimes much taller; its lanceolate or oblong leaves, sparingly toothed toward the apex, are an inch or more long, evergreen, leathery, shining on the upper surface, and of a fine dark green color; the small flowers are axillary, and the solitary fertile ones produce small black berries. It is found in sandy grounds along the coast from New England to Florida. It is deemed efficacious in intermittent fevers, but its chief use is for decoration. Its delicate brilliant green leaves, upon slender flexible stems, especially fit it for working in with flowers in bouquets. Quantities of it are sent from the southern counties of New Jersey to the New York florists, who keep it in good condition in a cool cellar for several months.

Inkberry (Ilex glabra).

Inkberry (Ilex glabra).