Inkerman, a Russian village in the south of the Crimea, on the site of a ruined city, supposed to be the Ctenos mentioned by Strabo, at the head of the harbor of Sebastopol, and 35 m. S. S. W. of Simferopol. It stands at the foot of a hill rising several hundred feet perpendicularly above the valley of the Tchernaya, crowned by massive walls and remains of towers. The side of the hill is pierced by numerous artificial caves, hewn from the solid rock, resembling the ruins found in Idumaea, but unlike any others in Europe. Near by is a church similarly constructed. The caves were probably made by the persecuted Arians, and were afterward occupied by Christian cenobites, as is shown by the paintings, chapels, and remains of altars found in them. On the heights of Inkerman, on the side of the valley opposite to the ruins, the Russians were defeated, Nov. 5, 1854, by the French and English. A monument to the memory of the fallen has been erected on the battle field.

Monument at Inkerman.

Monument at Inkerman.